12 sustainable design ideas from nature | Janine Benyus


It is a thrill to be here at a conference that’s devoted to “Inspired by Nature” — you can imagine. And I’m also thrilled to be in the foreplay section. Did you notice this section is foreplay? Because I get to talk about one of my favorite critters, which is the Western Grebe. You haven’t lived until you’ve seen these guys do their courtship dance. I was on Bowman Lake in Glacier National Park, which is a long, skinny lake with sort of mountains upside down in it, and my partner and I have a rowing shell. And so we were rowing, and one of these Western Grebes came along. And what they do for their courtship dance is, they go together, the two of them, the two mates, and they begin to run underwater. They paddle faster, and faster, and faster, until they’re going so fast that they literally lift up out of the water, and they’re standing upright, sort of paddling the top of the water. And one of these Grebes came along while we were rowing. And so we’re in a skull, and we’re moving really, really quickly. And this Grebe, I think, sort of, mistaked us for a prospect, and started to run along the water next to us, in a courtship dance — for miles. It would stop, and then start, and then stop, and then start. Now that is foreplay. (Laughter) I came this close to changing species at that moment. Obviously, life can teach us something in the entertainment section. Life has a lot to teach us. But what I’d like to talk about today is what life might teach us in technology and in design. What’s happened since the book came out — the book was mainly about research in biomimicry — and what’s happened since then is architects, designers, engineers — people who make our world — have started to call and say, we want a biologist to sit at the design table to help us, in real time, become inspired. Or — and this is the fun part for me — we want you to take us out into the natural world. We’ll come with a design challenge and we find the champion adapters in the natural world, who might inspire us. So this is a picture from a Galapagos trip that we took with some wastewater treatment engineers; they purify wastewater. And some of them were very resistant, actually, to being there. What they said to us at first was, you know, we already do biomimicry. We use bacteria to clean our water. And we said, well, that’s not exactly being inspired by nature. That’s bioprocessing, you know; that’s bio-assisted technology: using an organism to do your wastewater treatment is an old, old technology called “domestication.” This is learning something, learning an idea, from an organism and then applying it. And so they still weren’t getting it. So we went for a walk on the beach and I said, well, give me one of your big problems. Give me a design challenge, sustainability speed bump, that’s keeping you from being sustainable. And they said scaling, which is the build-up of minerals inside of pipes. And they said, you know what happens is, mineral — just like at your house — mineral builds up. And then the aperture closes, and we have to flush the pipes with toxins, or we have to dig them up. So if we had some way to stop this scaling — and so I picked up some shells on the beach. And I asked them, what is scaling? What’s inside your pipes? And they said, calcium carbonate. And I said, that’s what this is; this is calcium carbonate. And they didn’t know that. They didn’t know that what a seashell is, it’s templated by proteins, and then ions from the seawater crystallize in place to create a shell. So the same sort of a process, without the proteins, is happening on the inside of their pipes. They didn’t know. This is not for lack of information; it’s a lack of integration. You know, it’s a silo, people in silos. They didn’t know that the same thing was happening. So one of them thought about it and said, OK, well, if this is just crystallization that happens automatically out of seawater — self-assembly — then why aren’t shells infinite in size? What stops the scaling? Why don’t they just keep on going? And I said, well, in the same way that they exude a protein and it starts the crystallization — and then they all sort of leaned in — they let go of a protein that stops the crystallization. It literally adheres to the growing face of the crystal. And, in fact, there is a product called TPA that’s mimicked that protein — that stop-protein — and it’s an environmentally friendly way to stop scaling in pipes. That changed everything. From then on, you could not get these engineers back in the boat. The first day they would take a hike, and it was, click, click, click, click. Five minutes later they were back in the boat. We’re done. You know, I’ve seen that island. After this, they were crawling all over. They would snorkel for as long as we would let them snorkel. What had happened was that they realized that there were organisms out there that had already solved the problems that they had spent their careers trying to solve. Learning about the natural world is one thing; learning from the natural world — that’s the switch. That’s the profound switch. What they realized was that the answers to their questions are everywhere; they just needed to change the lenses with which they saw the world. 3.8 billion years of field-testing. 10 to 30 — Craig Venter will probably tell you; I think there’s a lot more than 30 million — well-adapted solutions. The important thing for me is that these are solutions solved in context. And the context is the Earth — the same context that we’re trying to solve our problems in. So it’s the conscious emulation of life’s genius. It’s not slavishly mimicking — although Al is trying to get the hairdo going — it’s not a slavish mimicry; it’s taking the design principles, the genius of the natural world, and learning something from it. Now, in a group with so many IT people, I do have to mention what I’m not going to talk about, and that is that your field is one that has learned an enormous amount from living things, on the software side. So there’s computers that protect themselves, like an immune system, and we’re learning from gene regulation and biological development. And we’re learning from neural nets, genetic algorithms, evolutionary computing. That’s on the software side. But what’s interesting to me is that we haven’t looked at this, as much. I mean, these machines are really not very high tech in my estimation in the sense that there’s dozens and dozens of carcinogens in the water in Silicon Valley. So the hardware is not at all up to snuff in terms of what life would call a success. So what can we learn about making — not just computers, but everything? The plane you came in, cars, the seats that you’re sitting on. How do we redesign the world that we make, the human-made world? More importantly, what should we ask in the next 10 years? And there’s a lot of cool technologies out there that life has. What’s the syllabus? Three questions, for me, are key. How does life make things? This is the opposite; this is how we make things. It’s called heat, beat and treat — that’s what material scientists call it. And it’s carving things down from the top, with 96 percent waste left over and only 4 percent product. You heat it up; you beat it with high pressures; you use chemicals. OK. Heat, beat and treat. Life can’t afford to do that. How does life make things? How does life make the most of things? That’s a geranium pollen. And its shape is what gives it the function of being able to tumble through air so easily. Look at that shape. Life adds information to matter. In other words: structure. It gives it information. By adding information to matter, it gives it a function that’s different than without that structure. And thirdly, how does life make things disappear into systems? Because life doesn’t really deal in things; there are no things in the natural world divorced from their systems. Really quick syllabus. As I’m reading more and more now, and following the story, there are some amazing things coming up in the biological sciences. And at the same time, I’m listening to a lot of businesses and finding what their sort of grand challenges are. The two groups are not talking to each other. At all. What in the world of biology might be helpful at this juncture, to get us through this sort of evolutionary knothole that we’re in? I’m going to try to go through 12, really quickly. One that’s exciting to me is self-assembly. Now, you’ve heard about this in terms of nanotechnology. Back to that shell: the shell is a self-assembling material. On the lower left there is a picture of mother of pearl forming out of seawater. It’s a layered structure that’s mineral and then polymer, and it makes it very, very tough. It’s twice as tough as our high-tech ceramics. But what’s really interesting: unlike our ceramics that are in kilns, it happens in seawater. It happens near, in and near, the organism’s body. This is Sandia National Labs. A guy named Jeff Brinker has found a way to have a self-assembling coding process. Imagine being able to make ceramics at room temperature by simply dipping something into a liquid, lifting it out of the liquid, and having evaporation force the molecules in the liquid together, so that they jigsaw together in the same way as this crystallization works. Imagine making all of our hard materials that way. Imagine spraying the precursors to a PV cell, to a solar cell, onto a roof, and having it self-assemble into a layered structure that harvests light. Here’s an interesting one for the IT world: bio-silicon. This is a diatom, which is made of silicates. And so silicon, which we make right now — it’s part of our carcinogenic problem in the manufacture of our chips — this is a bio-mineralization process that’s now being mimicked. This is at UC Santa Barbara. Look at these diatoms. This is from Ernst Haeckel’s work. Imagine being able to — and, again, it’s a templated process, and it solidifies out of a liquid process — imagine being able to have that sort of structure coming out at room temperature. Imagine being able to make perfect lenses. On the left, this is a brittle star; it’s covered with lenses that the people at Lucent Technologies have found have no distortion whatsoever. It’s one of the most distortion-free lenses we know of. And there’s many of them, all over its entire body. What’s interesting, again, is that it self-assembles. A woman named Joanna Aizenberg, at Lucent, is now learning to do this in a low-temperature process to create these sort of lenses. She’s also looking at fiber optics. That’s a sea sponge that has a fiber optic. Down at the very base of it, there’s fiber optics that work better than ours, actually, to move light, but you can tie them in a knot; they’re incredibly flexible. Here’s another big idea: CO2 as a feedstock. A guy named Geoff Coates, at Cornell, said to himself, you know, plants do not see CO2 as the biggest poison of our time. We see it that way. Plants are busy making long chains of starches and glucose, right, out of CO2. He’s found a way — he’s found a catalyst — and he’s found a way to take CO2 and make it into polycarbonates. Biodegradable plastics out of CO2 — how plant-like. Solar transformations: the most exciting one. There are people who are mimicking the energy-harvesting device inside of purple bacterium, the people at ASU. Even more interesting, lately, in the last couple of weeks, people have seen that there’s an enzyme called hydrogenase that’s able to evolve hydrogen from proton and electrons, and is able to take hydrogen up — basically what’s happening in a fuel cell, in the anode of a fuel cell and in a reversible fuel cell. In our fuel cells, we do it with platinum; life does it with a very, very common iron. And a team has now just been able to mimic that hydrogen-juggling hydrogenase. That’s very exciting for fuel cells — to be able to do that without platinum. Power of shape: here’s a whale. We’ve seen that the fins of this whale have tubercles on them. And those little bumps actually increase efficiency in, for instance, the edge of an airplane — increase efficiency by about 32 percent. Which is an amazing fossil fuel savings, if we were to just put that on the edge of a wing. Color without pigments: this peacock is creating color with shape. Light comes through, it bounces back off the layers; it’s called thin-film interference. Imagine being able to self-assemble products with the last few layers playing with light to create color. Imagine being able to create a shape on the outside of a surface, so that it’s self-cleaning with just water. That’s what a leaf does. See that up-close picture? That’s a ball of water, and those are dirt particles. And that’s an up-close picture of a lotus leaf. There’s a company making a product called Lotusan, which mimics — when the building facade paint dries, it mimics the bumps in a self-cleaning leaf, and rainwater cleans the building. Water is going to be our big, grand challenge: quenching thirst. Here are two organisms that pull water. The one on the left is the Namibian beetle pulling water out of fog. The one on the right is a pill bug — pulls water out of air, does not drink fresh water. Pulling water out of Monterey fog and out of the sweaty air in Atlanta, before it gets into a building, are key technologies. Separation technologies are going to be extremely important. What if we were to say, no more hard rock mining? What if we were to separate out metals from waste streams, small amounts of metals in water? That’s what microbes do; they chelate metals out of water. There’s a company here in San Francisco called MR3 that is embedding mimics of the microbes’ molecules on filters to mine waste streams. Green chemistry is chemistry in water. We do chemistry in organic solvents. This is a picture of the spinnerets coming out of a spider and the silk being formed from a spider. Isn’t that beautiful? Green chemistry is replacing our industrial chemistry with nature’s recipe book. It’s not easy, because life uses only a subset of the elements in the periodic table. And we use all of them, even the toxic ones. To figure out the elegant recipes that would take the small subset of the periodic table, and create miracle materials like that cell, is the task of green chemistry. Timed degradation: packaging that is good until you don’t want it to be good anymore, and dissolves on cue. That’s a mussel you can find in the waters out here, and the threads holding it to a rock are timed; at exactly two years, they begin to dissolve. Healing: this is a good one. That little guy over there is a tardigrade. There is a problem with vaccines around the world not getting to patients. And the reason is that the refrigeration somehow gets broken; what’s called the “cold chain” gets broken. A guy named Bruce Rosner looked at the tardigrade — which dries out completely, and yet stays alive for months and months and months, and is able to regenerate itself. And he found a way to dry out vaccines — encase them in the same sort of sugar capsules as the tardigrade has within its cells — meaning that vaccines no longer need to be refrigerated. They can be put in a glove compartment, OK. Learning from organisms. This is a session about water — learning about organisms that can do without water, in order to create a vaccine that lasts and lasts and lasts without refrigeration. I’m not going to get to 12. But what I am going to do is tell you that the most important thing, besides all of these adaptations, is the fact that these organisms have figured out a way to do the amazing things they do while taking care of the place that’s going to take care of their offspring. When they’re involved in foreplay, they’re thinking about something very, very important — and that’s having their genetic material remain, 10,000 generations from now. And that means finding a way to do what they do without destroying the place that’ll take care of their offspring. That’s the biggest design challenge. Luckily, there are millions and millions of geniuses willing to gift us with their best ideas. Good luck having a conversation with them. Thank you. (Applause) Chris Anderson: Talk about foreplay, I — we need to get to 12, but really quickly. Janine Benyus: Oh really? CA: Yeah. Just like, you know, like the 10-second version of 10, 11 and 12. Because we just — your slides are so gorgeous, and the ideas are so big, I can’t stand to let you go down without seeing 10, 11 and 12. JB: OK, put this — OK, I’ll just hold this thing. OK, great. OK, so that’s the healing one. Sensing and responding: feedback is a huge thing. This is a locust. There can be 80 million of them in a square kilometer, and yet they don’t collide with one another. And yet we have 3.6 million car collisions a year. (Laughter) Right. There’s a person at Newcastle who has figured out that it’s a very large neuron. And she’s actually figuring out how to make a collision-avoidance circuitry based on this very large neuron in the locust. This is a huge and important one, number 11. And that’s the growing fertility. That means, you know, net fertility farming. We should be growing fertility. And, oh yes — we get food, too. Because we have to grow the capacity of this planet to create more and more opportunities for life. And really, that’s what other organisms do as well. In ensemble, that’s what whole ecosystems do: they create more and more opportunities for life. Our farming has done the opposite. So, farming based on how a prairie builds soil, ranching based on how a native ungulate herd actually increases the health of the range, even wastewater treatment based on how a marsh not only cleans the water, but creates incredibly sparkling productivity. This is the simple design brief. I mean, it looks simple because the system, over 3.8 billion years, has worked this out. That is, those organisms that have not been able to figure out how to enhance or sweeten their places, are not around to tell us about it. That’s the twelfth one. Life — and this is the secret trick; this is the magic trick — life creates conditions conducive to life. It builds soil; it cleans air; it cleans water; it mixes the cocktail of gases that you and I need to live. And it does that in the middle of having great foreplay and meeting their needs. So it’s not mutually exclusive. We have to find a way to meet our needs, while making of this place an Eden. CA: Janine, thank you so much. (Applause)

100 comments

  • Murali N

    Janine Benyus. I SALUTE YOU

    Reply
  • Spiritboy mark

    Great..!! NOw, I have to go to pee.. xD

    Reply
  • cuneeda Anthony

    Leaving off the stupidity of mans evolution, and the first ten minutes very boring, I found this fascinating indeed.

    Reply
  • katehtown

    There are no "things," nothing is really separate from everything else. You are one "thing" but you are actually made up of trillions of also separate "things." You are in the universe, but the universe is one "thing." We are just all parts of one.

    Reply
  • painet1776

    Nature is the best teacher.

    Reply
  • Mel Binks

    @paulcbarrera tardigrade ! craziest little creatures ever .. I thought cockroaches were tough til I read about these little guys.

    Reply
  • RTRMediaInc

    Hi, Love your video. We're a television production company called RTR Media inc
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    Reply
  • Wai Tat Quak

    BRAVO #^_^ Learning from the NATURE WORLD!!!!!!!!!

    Reply
  • Mslekenam

    Engineers need to love challenges.. wow.

    Reply
  • Jamie Samman

    @hunterdougvid yip 🙂

    Reply
  • Daniel Bakshi

    @canada2992 ME!!!!

    Reply
  • jamsta1232

    fap fap fap fap…. AUGH MY ROOMATE QUICK PUT MY PANTS BACK ON!! good thing i had this backup video to switch to just in case someone walked in….

    Reply
  • On99Kyle

    fuck assignment videos…

    Reply
  • Holmes245

    Hmmm, design found in the natural world. Interesting.

    Reply
  • Lalo Alvarez

    well done.

    Reply
  • ihadacorncob

    can't.stand.her.accent

    Reply
  • PedanticNo1

    I'm not really noticing any inflection in particular. You must either be from a very distant part of the world (relative to her), or be extremely picky about accents.

    Reply
  • kallistiX1

    Utterly false. First of all, no specified information originally existed, it evolved. For example, eyes didn't just pop into existence and we can trace its origins a far ways back to ever more simplistic versions. Simply because we don't know exactly how every detail works YET doesn't mean that the only possible solution is magic. There are literally thousand of theories we would have to disprove completely before that is considered. All this points to is more questions for science to answer.

    Reply
  • kallistiX1

    Still false. We not only know that both inorganic and organic material does indeed self assemble but that doesn't take much energy or resources for either to do so and that nature actually encourages such things. Amino acids, for example, can occur naturally in the conditions of our early Earth or in space. The simple bonds that can form would be sufficient to lead further complexity, that is long chains of proteins and structure is mathematically assured. This is high school stuff.

    Reply
  • kallistiX1

    This is the problem with people taking the word of pundits about matters of science: not a single one of those things prohibits the forming of organics in the early Earth history (one actually points TOWARD a possibility of how this occurred). They pose difficulties but not insurmountable ones nor do those factors represent the totality of the chemistry or biochemistry. New discoveries are showing MORE not LESS evidence for this. Even reanalysis of old experiments is yielding such results.

    Reply
  • Deepak Nanda

    Biomimicry 2016!?!

    Reply
  • Jesus Ramos

    good job.

    Reply
  • robert powell

    @jamsta1232 why the f would you fap to this?

    Reply
  • oscar pond

    her accent sucks.

    Reply
  • douglas lopez

    awesome!

    Reply
  • Pure Green Coffee

    she sounds strange.

    Reply
  • Steven Dennis

    So strange.

    Reply
  • cathy rice

    Wow. Surprising.

    Reply
  • porksicles

    Wow, what an excellent presentation, and what a thought-provoking subject matter.

    Don't be put off by all the morons on here, this is highly inspiring stuff.

    Reply
  • Bonnie Sanders

    Very inspirational.

    Reply
  • Joshua Crow

    Interesting!

    Reply
  • Aaayejaaaye

    i was watching this on Netflix and just came here to like it i enjoyed this so much

    Reply
  • TheZrk2

    Lots of people, and we're all hating it.

    Reply
  • Nought Fayr

    Around 10:00 is when she starts naming off the ideas……..for anyone 'interested.'

    Reply
  • jrmunro111

    A God among men.

    Reply
  • 3bbblz

    Janine is a legend!

    Reply
  • RememberReach777

    lol right here too

    Reply
  • CCarter

    Very inspiring video.

    Reply
  • Naween Sidiqui

    Thank you so much saved so much time!! 😀

    Reply
  • nebdasthebarbarian

    1. Self Assembly
    2. Co2 as feedstock
    3. solar transformations
    4. The power of shape
    5. quenching thirst
    6. metals without mining
    7. green chemistry
    8. timed degradation

    Reply
  • youareme888

    i love you guys on the internet <3. helping university students do their homework, with minimal effort. I owe everything you you <3.

    Reply
  • Omar Little

    what is the difference between the biomimicry n biotechnology

    Reply
  • Melissa Brooks

    Very informative.

    Reply
  • Irene Temple

    Interesting topic. 🙂

    Reply
  • Topsoil Depletion Awareness (closing the loop)

    watch this short vid about biomimicry: /watch?v=4vq8ci4RTUs

    Reply
  • DJplastelina

    This video is so 2007…

    Reply
  • afichter tania

    You have awesome ideas.

    Reply
  • James Breaux

    TED, TED, TED.
    thanks for letting her finish…

    Reply
  • Alastair Carnegie

    Why is it that natural immunity out-perform vaccines nearly every time? Why does the multi-billion dollar vaccine industry engage in corrupt science? why do they pay scientists to falsify data? and suppress lethal iatrogenic reactions to vaccine insults? The answer to all these questions is economics! Humanity deserves better! "DO NO HARM!" is the foundation of Medicine! "MAKE OBSCENE PROFITS AT ANY COST!" appears to be the motto of Big Pharma? Science must intervene and get back on track again!

    Reply
  • C Elaine

    best comment ever <3 thank you for that.

    Reply
  • C Elaine

    lol I know, it was iffy there for a second! 🙂

    Reply
  • Alastair Carnegie

    Parents of vaccine damaded children, might tell you to shut up as well, but they would probably prefer that you educate yourself about the dangers of vaccines. The 'black helicopter/space lizards' comment was juvenile and pathetic! grow up!

    Reply
  • Alastair Carnegie

    BOLLOCKS I am an applied mathematician! I'VE SEEN STATISTICAL FRAUD MYSELF! The report is known in English as, "A Population-Based Study of Measles, Mumps, and Rubella Vaccination and Autism" by K.M. Madsen and Others and was published in The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) November 7, 2002 (Vol. 347 No. 19). The authors claimed to confirm that there was no connection between autism and MMR vaccine.Their manipulation of statistics is at best mistaken and at worst, deliberate fraud.

    Reply
  • Alastair Carnegie

    Your wife will be able to check these OFFICIAL VAERs STATISTICS from 2011. "Here is the current body count in VAERs: Hepatitis B vaccine 50,275 reports – 979 deaths, DTaP vaccine (pertussis, diptheria, tetanus) 50,345 reports – 785 deaths, MMR vaccine 58,887 reports – 300 deaths, Gardasil vaccine 22,563 reports – 99 deaths." REALITY makes your claims look rather stupid ! for a self appointed gatekeeper of the dismal citadel of authodoxy! Wakefield could sue you for that fabricated lie!

    Reply
  • Muha jusupov

    Doing mine for first year architecture!!

    Reply
  • Zieq Hakim

    Doing it now for 1st year architecture, Technology of Design.

    Reply
  • Susan Obrant

    Thank you!!

    Reply
  • yuuuuup

    her voice bothers me

    Reply
  • Te Gan

    Hmmm design…where did it come from?
    Thank you for pursuing what God has given us free of charge..
    Love you scientists… You just keep proving His existence.
    From the depths of the ocean to the tops of mountains life here on Earth has been given the ability to continue. Let's hope we continue to learn these lessons that intelligent people are now acknowledging.. 

    Reply
  • OSHbots

    Great presentation, excellent speaker.

    Reply
  • Mac Kroupensky

    brilliant!

    Reply
  • Theresa Southam

    I love the biomimicry movement!  Its the most inspiring thing going right now.

    Reply
  • carrie a. dyer

    amazing. 

    Reply
  • msGvious

    Janine speaks beautifully. Love this talk.

    Reply
  • Earthgoddess winton

    Great Video Janie Benyus, it is so exciting to learn about this new design focus. Thank you. 

    Reply
  • Mike Shinn

    This is inspirational. What we can learn from nature offers real hope for solving some of the intractable problems we face, such as using less energy, reducing pollution, living in harmony with the environment.

    Reply
  • Daniel Talbert

    "Genius of the natural world"  Sounds like a genius made it.

    Reply
  • Robert W

    The robber barons arent going to like this(but yet this is 7 yrs ago) we thought we were smart in past i think not  Now were being smart   Just like im so mad at doctors in 1972 telling my mother it not good to breast feed here buy this formula ugh…..

    Reply
  • Robert L Ruisi

    I am thrilled to have watched this I can't begin to say enough Janine Benyus hats off. I firmly believe we are the caretakers of the garden and you are on the threshold of doing just that. I am just so so… Humble thanks for everything you are doing.

    Reply
  • Ely Britto

    Many years ago, science began a new branch  named Cybernetics (nature´s imitation)! That new science was destroyed,  maybe for economics interests. It survived! Wonderful!

    Reply
  • Peri Grinn

    You know what else would be a good idea for the self-cleaning surfaces? Cars.

    Reply
  • Phil X

    I am wondering how can people not see God's work in nature.

    Reply
  • Wali G

    More impact-ful if you don't use all capitalization in the slides.  Some great questions posed, such as: "How does life make things?"

    Reply
  • Paul Meyer

    Whenever reckless resource plundering occurs, the possibility to explore natural assets diminishes accordingly.

    Reply
  • Clayman Clutcher

    EVERYONE WATCH THIS.

    Reply
  • Marko Kujundzic

    She looks like Bill Clinton.

    Reply
  • Wendy Wyatt

    #AMAZING #VIDEO!
    1ofTheBEST in #TedTalks
    MyFavorite
    -> #JanineBenyus:
    12 #sustainable #Design #Ideas from #Nature 🙂

    Reply
  • bkastrinos

    The genius of the natural world…so difficult to avoid words like design, genius, plan. Time and chance, just a wonderful delusion of reality. So wise, yet we just don't get it.

    Reply
  • Girish kumar

    is bio mimicry a part of biotechnology

    Reply
  • Haleem ul Hassan

    Its truly tragic how we have become literally blind to the truth, even when its staring right at our faces. The most intellectual of people, the scientists, the thinkers, the developers, the biologists, ALL of them see these scientific and design miracles performed by these creatures, solutions that are higher than an average man's intellect, let alone those meager creatures themselves, and they STILL refuse to admit that there is a Designer behind creation. They will do anything to escape from the word God, calling this with things like nature, life etc. How nature does this, how life does that. Well what IS nature? We need to wake up and recognise the One Being behind the intelligent and aesthetic design that we see all around us, and within us as well.

    Reply
  • Aelita Stones

    I love the lecture, but the intro was unnecessary….

    Reply
  • MrJodenkoek1

    Why all these great ideas and still afther 9 years almost no progress? Stil a great video.

    Reply
  • Janice Dewdney

    2007 and we are getting further and further away from a more natural way of life. We are pretty much F**kd.
    Meaning of 'insanity' Using the same behaviour expecting different out comes.

    Love this Lady

    Reply
  • RealEstateInsider247

    How about medical treatments. Say in treating cancer … using nature to heal as opposed to chemotherapy and radiation; both which are toxic AND cause cancer. Oh yea, that does exist. The problem is, the corruption between the FDA, pharmaceutical companies, and big cancer dollars won't allow alternative treatments into the U.S. The cancer of corruption has metastasized throughout our entire medical system.

    Reply
  • Sarasadat Tejareh

    The lessons were really nice… we should really step into learning FROM the nature, and not only about the nature …and then we would realise that there should be great consciousness behind all these miracles, who add data to matter!

    Reply
  • plplpl iuiuy

    This is nothing more than copying God's design–To think Nature can do this naturally, all by itself is absurd–God designed nature to do this. Nature is nothing more than God's creative design being applied thru programming of DNA, etc and Science is discovering that is in fact what is happening.

    Case in point–Scientists have found cells that can calculate geometry, and other forms of hard math and it is within the cells that is how your eyes can focus so well, the cells can do math–Scientists in London and MIT discovered this, I could go on but will stop now.

    Reply
  • Pinkman

    Intelligent design is a fact I don't know how can Atheist think intelligent design is stupid when we have to copy the creation to make anything.

    Reply
  • Dustin

    This was in 2007. So what happened? Did all this research get defunded when the economy crashed? We need these technologies now more than ever.

    Reply
  • RichardJLC

    Very cool. Those sensors that prevent collisions maybe could be used with satellites orbiting the earth. There are, supposedly, thousands of them circling the planet, and some do crash into others creating 1000's of pieces that need to be tracked. Who gets that job? Not a fun job, but these sensors can eliminate his/her/its job…maybe. Of course, that would mean they a way was found to eliminate of those pieces that are already up there moving at high speeds.

    Reply
  • Saju Depalan

    terrific

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  • Mycel

    she loves foreplay, but then she finished early. :/

    Reply
  • Modi Rasheed

    If only scientists read the Quran

    Reply
  • Kevin Ward

    the whole fractal fibannoci platonic thing i think is relevant here. with regards to optimizing spacial efficiency in architecture and such.

    Reply
  • Sidharth Parmar

    Super… just amazing…..!!!

    Reply
  • Lala's Pursuit of Happiness

    Awesome!!!

    Reply
  • A Mishel

    Nature +time = god

    Reply
  • Adam Davis

    Locust avoidance system is quite a simple one. they only have to keep from crashing into the nearest locust to it. and when they all use that system none of them crash into one another. something similar to auto-assisted parking and lane merging.

    Reply
  • Normal name

    So many bible thumpers….. like damn

    Reply
  • JbAon X

    She strongly reminds me of Jody Foster. I like her

    Reply
  • R S

    2k19 tho

    Reply

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