Correctly Dimension your Sketches! CAD for Newbies with Fusion 360


In today’s video. We’re going to talk about proper dimensioning of your sketches within fusion [360] [let’s] get started How’s it going guys welcome [back] to another fusion 360 cad for Newbies tutorial series here on makers Muse? So what do I mean when I say correct dimensioning of sketches? So sketches are a? Fundamental part of 3d modeling in Fusion 360 you draw a sketch, and then you do sign with it you might Extrude it into it through the object you might revolve it or you might sweep along a path or do various other functions to it but basically that sketch is the starting point of Everything in your design when [you’re] design parametrically But when it comes to design things accurately you know with a pair of calipers and measuring things for real-World projects these things You really need to be careful of how you put in those dimensions because when you go back to perhaps change things you want things to update in a way that they should and not explode or Update incorrectly and get parts that don’t quite work, so in this video I’m going to go through basically my process of doing good dimensioning and To stress it [is] how I approach it it may not be a way that you’re comfortable with you might like to do things like Differently a totally cool it’s just how I do it and what I’m going to show you here isn’t really [a] replacement of a University degree in 3d modeling It’s not intended to be journey just to help you think about correct dimensioning for your awesome 3d printing projects isn’t using Fusion 360 alright, so let’s start with a sketch I’m going to click a sketch create sketch and top plane here So a big part of fusion 360 is loading the hot keys so I’m going to hit R and that’s for rectangle So I’m just going to draw a rectangle here in space Now you just would have seen some numbers pop up there briefly you can actually Put pump in dimensions as you’re drawing shapes in fusion in the sketch mode, but I’m going to do it afterwards using the dimension tool so we’ve got a rectangle here and It’s blue and if I just hit escape there, it doesn’t really know what it wants to be in life It’s any size, and it’s any shape and it’s anywhere in your workspace, so when you’re dimensioning sketches Everything comes back to a single point which is called your origin so the origin of this entire 3D workspace is here and that is 0 0 0 [which] is 0 in the x y and Z axis so it’s [where] everything converges into at one point that is [zero] where everything starts and everything’s were eventually referenced back to that, and that’s how you can lock things in space even a assembly of hundreds of components will actually be locked to an origin or at least Via other components locking to each other it all feeds back to an origin otherwise things will not know where to sort of lock in space so we’ve got this rectangle and Let’s say we’re designing a plate that’s 30 by 40 millimeters. How would you go about? dimensioning it so I’m going to hit [thee] and The most obvious approach would be to just select the line, so when I hover over on the sketch dimensioning tool the Line highlights and I can click there and hit 40 enter and here and here’s 30 and enter escape So we’ve got our little rectangle here But you notice is still blue so the cool thing about the latest version of fusion is The Lines will go black when they’re what’s known as fully defined when they’re fully locked in space Everything is accounted for in terms of where they should be but it’s blue here which means if I move this rectangle around Yep, it doesn’t know where it wants to be in space So we need to tell it where it should be by using dimensions to dimension it and reference it to the origin so again Deeper Dimension let’s say we just did this edge here [to] the origin there Yeah, 40 sounds good, and maybe this top part here to the origin there and let’s go is 16 Or 10 10 is fine, okay? So our sketch has gone black, and that’s fantastic but this isn’t really a good way to dimension sketch and The reason is we’ve kind of put it in this random place off to the side where as the origin should be used as a tool and It should be used to reference other things that you’re going [to] build later and help you build those shapes Because don’t forget our planes are based off the origin for example if I turn origin on and look down here We’ve got you know our xy plane, you [know] we’ve got a Xz Plane y Zed plane these are all the planes that you can sketch on by default [now] you can create Construction planes and all these sort of things which I’ll go into in further detail in other [videos] But these are what you start with and it’s good to actually use what you start with so I’m going to get rid [of] those dimensions and Instead let’s say. I’m drawing something symmetrical well, I probably want the origin in the middle of our shape So how would you do that would you start moving our shape here and then? Going D. And then clicking the origin and then clicking the edge there and then selecting for t – you know – 20 Sure, that would start working that would definitely kind of work But there’s also another feature that’s extremely powerful built in to fusion 360 Which are constraints so constraints are ways to lock Geometry together? And I’m going to go into them in their very own video But to show you briefly how constraint works what I’m going to do is select Origin click there shift select a line there at the bottom of our rectangle right Click and You notice there we have various constraints that have automatically popped up that we can use coincident or midpoint midpoint so what that’s done is that stuck our origin right in the middle of our shape and No matter what size we make it for example 40 let’s make it 70. It’s always going to be exactly [in] the middle Which is very useful for keeping us locked in space, okay? Let me show you another case of dimensioning this rectangle Let’s say us. Delete the 40 here and the 30 here and Let’s add some phillips. So let’s go to sketch and Fill it and let’s select these edges here Let’s say we’re creating That looks fine. Let’s say, we’re creating like a lozenge [Style] Shape like that with rounded Corners how would you to mention this? So yes Fusion is clever enough to know that if we have de mentioned it before and then we had philips it will Leave little points of where the edges of the line were but it’s not very good practice I would say you can dimension this pretty much exactly how we did it before however instead of clicking just one line Like that we now are going to go down and click the other line there Sturdy, you can see what’s coming next this line and this line 40 Like that, but it’s still blue and the clever thing about fusion is we can actually try to work out. Why it’s blue What’s happened is when I did the philips. I’ve lost that constraint down the bottom there, so let’s just add another constraint back in like that midpoint So there’s our fully constrained shape but instead of just selecting a single line as our dimension I’ve selected between two lines to do a dimension, so dimensioning is actually really quite clever the tool itself can discern between Selecting a line selecting a point between a line and a point between a point and a [point] Selecting a Arc and working out that the dimension for [example] the radius or the diameter of that? also, we can do angles so let’s say we want to do a Little detail off the edge of [it]. Let’s do a line here. [let’s] do a line like that, okay scape let’s add some Angle Dimensions, so let’s Select D Select the line and let’s select another line We want to get to the the angle off like this one here there we go. So let’s make that 45 why not let’s make it 45? there we go and Similarly this one we can [actually] dimension an angle off as well We could dimension off that same horizontal line. We could dimension off the other line as to that Let’s do 30 so now I’ve got the [angles] set, but we can still make [it] taller So we need to change the height And this is where you need to [start] thinking ahead as to where you want to put your dimensions So let’s say this little party hat we want it to be Let’s say you want to make you want to make it about that size, whatever it is. We can dimension it here 19:19 millimeters, or we could dimension it? down to the origin 49 millimeters So which one’s better? We’ve got the same thing it still knows where how high it is I don’t know where it is along the edge of the shape. Let’s just define that for example Let’s like this Edge there this edge there 10 right everything is constrained everything looks good What if we changed the height of our lawson shape? What if he made that? 40 Our hats gone all weird. So what’s happening there is We’ve dimensioned the hat detail [is] going [to] call it a hat detail to the origin so now it has to squish in to accommodate for the Lawson’s Rounded Square, or rectangle shape getting larger That’s not what we want. We [want] that to be the same size all the time undo So in this case what you actually want to do is dimension to the top of your shape like this 19 totally fine, and if we made our shape 50 There you go, so it expands up, but our little hat detail stays the same So this is what you need to keep in mind when you’re dimensioning things Because you’re probably going to do what’s called iterative design. Where you go back to the drawing board almost and Change details of your original sketches you May have [1020] sketches in your actual component in your actual feature tree but by keeping in mind how things will scale and adapt you know avoid things breaking and crashing into each other and one more example would be bolt patterns, so let’s say you’ve got a It’s got a certain bolt pattern that’s just hit circles [I] see straw hole their hole there hole there okay, and then d make that one six one four and [this] one to my not okay, so [let’s] say that our bolt pattern is like this Right I’ve already worked out the dimensions, and I know exactly rode it is how would [I] dimension it so you could dimension? you know this one to this edge there and The top here you could dimension this one to here You could imagine this one With a angled here in and an angle dimension like that And I could dimension this one here as well for example Things aren’t locked in so what I want to do [on] door dimension to the bottom here as well. Let’s say, okay So once again, so you can see that everything is constrained, but again. It’s constrained poorly Because what we want to do is say we want to change the size of our plate say you want to make it a little bit smaller for Example, we want to make it 35 watch those holes They’ve changed our bolt pattern will no longer work Because we didn’t define them properly in relation to each other We didn’t give them the proper dimensions in relation to each other to adapt when we change other dimensions in the sketch So that’s just undo those those dimensions and let’s have another think about how you might want to do it So that’s our pattern Therefore it should lock into itself before we do anything else So that’s going to be and let’s make sure it’s locked in now This is my personal preference [you] may may feel otherwise, but I generally try to avoid Angled dimensions because they’re very hard to look into space I try to do dimensions on the x or y so I try to dimension here five, and then I’ll do another dimension To work out how long far away? They are and that to mention [So6] okay? Those are done now that we can dimension this one Either off the original hole or this one depending on if they’re likely to change or not in your design I don’t think these are in my design, so I was to mention them [here] again seven and six fine these are all be dimensions that you have gotten using your trusty calipers and Written down on your trusty grid paper by the way Always write down [your] drawings your designs before going into cad But what I’ve done now is just I remove this around you notice they look together even though. They’re still blue The whole Pattern can never change? Which means all I need now is to define where it should be on this plate for example I can define it to my origin then the bottom here so I can define that as [year] 19 and You know whatever anger dimension that you find useful five so even if I make this plate thirty across or maybe if I make this plate hundred across The holes are not going to change our bolt pattern still going to work and our motor is still evolved into place [I] cannot stress enough how important it is to take into consideration the relation [of] different dimensions Within your part and how that when you change something it might affect and have a knock-on effect down the line this can mean if you know adding a point five millimeter tolerance to something if you’ve got something, that’s Referencing it and that tolerance bumps it across you might be putting something out of tolerance. [it] does take practice and again This is really my approach to 3D modeling. I am very analytical. [I] do like to develop a very detailed sketch That works first time sort of going back with features again again, but it’s just usually how I roll thanks for watching guys Have you found this video on Fusion 360 useful in terms of developing good? sketches for your three modeling projects because this sketch is the base it’s the Bedrock of your 3D modeling project and through your feature tree you need good sketches to avoid things break and then having to go [back] and rebuild them and Every year no designs right first time let’s be honest usually neither three shots or so to get it, right? and You don’t want to come back that second time round and change something only to find that you can’t actually change it properly because things Have been referenced to the wrong areas also I want to pause this video and say a big thank you to Robert who by matter hackers passed this on to me, so 3d modeling on software is amazingly Powerful, but Robert Thank you so much for seeing this to me for those who have never seen us [before] this is a proper Vintage measured drawing kit so back in the days before computers You would have grid paper And you’ll be doing what we just saw on the software by hand This is the original kit that [Robert] sent to me and man. Thank you so [much] I will treasure this and I will definitely look after it. Thank you so much for that Robert and for everyone else That’s just a [snip] of a sneak peek into the past as to how you would have had to do things previously Things are a lot easier these days if you enjoyed this video on Fusion 360 on makers music I see that subscribe button helps us out a huge amount and look forward to seeing again very shortly catch you later guys. Bye the Protector Each plate [is] placed satellite

100 comments

  • cartoon whale

    finally this saved me alot of conFUSION (see wat i did there)

    Reply
  • Nickolas B

    lmao, autodesk fusion is literally a program that should be called CAD for newbs, thats why they make inventor for the pros

    Reply
  • Felix Smylie

    Is the AG Agura quiet , because of the elekcromotors , i came to this video that you can answer me:) Greetings from middle europe!:D

    Reply
  • Bill Field

    Excellent advice Angus.. I have been a toolmaker for about 30 years and you would be surprised how many Engineers use the wrong type of dimensioning in manufacturing drawings. Thanks for another great tutorial.

    Reply
  • markustube

    I'm a big fan of ALL your 3D modelling videos. Glad you're using Fusion now, but even the vids you did with OnShape were very useful, as I could always apply the same concepts to Fusion. Thanks!

    Reply
  • Garry Stern

    Another great Fusion 360 video Angus! Thank you. Back in the 80's I studied drafting in technical school and I have all the, I guess you could say "vintage" drafting tools including a kit like the one you have. Manual labor days, look how far we have come!

    Reply
  • Kowboy USA

    I started downloading Fusion 360, but got an email saying it was free for "30 days." Is it free to use for personal use? Or only free for 30 days?

    Reply
  • SWALBERG

    Great video! I would love to see another video like this for the overall timeline of a design (components, assemblies, etc) so that when you go back into a completed file and make a change, the features don't blow up.

    Reply
  • Kowboy USA

    Super nice kit, Robert.

    Reply
  • Drew Bransby

    UGH Inventor professional is so much better. I'm 15 and taught myself how to use it. It's Not hard

    Reply
  • Th12teen

    Just ordered my 3D printer, and this video has helped me so much already. I modeled a fidget spinner last night, with VERY bad dimmensioning and constraints. I can't wait to redo the model now that I have a better idea of how to put it together.

    Reply
  • Ali Khajah

    I enjoyed this video so much, made a lot of sense. Looking forward for a vid about constraints.. those always get me scratching my head. Thank you.

    Reply
  • Adrian Staicu

    I love numbers too… but I recently created a key chain, just 4x4cm box with logo cut out in the middle, and lets say that SVG insert was a pain to insert in the correct spot. So how do you group this so you can give it a width and a height?

    Reply
  • Dave Cooper

    Am I the only one who didn't have the 'constraints' option in the right click drop down menu? I found a forum post that said '
    All the constraints are available from the Sketch Palette now. We
    removed the constraint command from the drop-down but made them always
    available when in sketch environment' and there it was. Are you using an old version of fusion 360 or am I missing something. If you are using an old version you may want to update this as it makes it really hard to follow as a 'newb' if the commands you are using aren't there.

    Reply
  • steve allen

    Excellent vid, can't wait for the next.steve

    Reply
  • Manuel Gozzi

    please do onshape tutorial

    Reply
  • Gil B

    I learn design with a K&E set just like that one
    then learn he SUPPER AutoCAD 12 dos to transfer a bit latter to 13 Win
    and finish with 2004 but never work before with constrain
    now I have Fusion 360 and you are the greatest help that I can find
    just because you go to the basic and I think that I am not the only one that need it
    Thank !

    Reply
  • Quinton B

    +makers muse do you think that a m3d printer with 4 rolls of filament ,3 used one brand new is a good deal,anyone else chime in, thanks!

    Reply
  • Dunstonuk

    It would be great if you could show hot to import an Existing STL file and make it reworkable in F360

    Reply
  • Joel Reid

    I would love to see you make an episode about common flaws with stls that people upload online that make life harder for users/downloaders.

    1. Not "repairing" your model first
    2. Not centering model close to the origin (which causes the model to appear far away)
    3. using unnecessary detail that will not possibly be picked up by 3D printers, even good ones
    4. more?

    Reply
  • Kris McMillen

    Simply called drafting, Thanks so much Angus, good stuff.

    Reply
  • Winston Smith

    Very well presented, enough so that even I could follow it. More please!

    Reply
  • Nykachuu

    Even though I can 3d model, my process is really poor, thanks for the tutorials!

    Reply
  • Israel Tennis

    Tip on Cad software, don't overload the first sketch with too many details. Separate feature sketches out into multiple extrusions or cuts. You will be able to suppress or remove features later in design if a feature doesn't fit the base size of the component later. Great video for beginners!

    Reply
  • MCgamingPro

    Just created a missing part for my water dispenser in fusion 360, almost done printing, very helpful video 😀

    Reply
  • theflamingpi

    Good one! It was very informative and will be very useful.

    Reply
  • Hari Wiguna

    Angus, this is awesome! Although I already knew how to use dimensions, you explained the LOGIC behind dimensioning correctly — something I certainly could do better. You are a great teacher! Thanks Angus! Love your channel!

    Reply
  • BLOOGaming

    Dude. I literally downloaded fusion 360 on Friday. And then I find out you published a tutorial on it two days before.

    Reply
  • Gary Wheeler

    Nice how the tutorial is kinda oriented to robotics. That is, motor bolt patterns for instance being a constraint.

    The same might be true for a battery bolt pattern, an arduino bolt pattern, a transmission bolt pattern I assume.

    Reply
  • Mark Hancock

    Angus,
    I am not sure if you have played with programming and Object Oriented (OO) Design; but, I feel that OO is a great way to think for all designs (including CAD). I find OO as a very helpful way to address some of the dimensioning issues you mentioned. In your video, I see three Objects within the Design you created: the Motor Mount, the Hat (of Shark Fin) and the Base. Each of these objects have properties that define their function and it is own; so, it should be described and dimensioned on its own (just like you did for the motor mount). That object should then be set in relation to the object that it has a relation to. Ex: What is the motor for? Does it couple to something on the Hat, then dimension it the Hat, not the Base. The same for the Hat, what is its purpose and how should it be dimensioned as a result of that? This is especially important as designs become more complex.

    Hope that makes sense.
    Anyway, good simple points in the video.
    Mark

    Reply
  • Wayne Dollery

    Mate, thanks for your efforts with showing us noobs the ins and outs of 3d printing with the bonus of your real world application. (And we need more ozzie accents on youtube).

    Reply
  • James Ferrari

    Great video, can't agree more on the importance of correctly dimensioning a drawing. In my mech eng degree we had to progress through a session on hand drawing mechanical drawings before moving onto CAD.. still messed up and had my drawings explode after changing a dimension a couple of times though haha

    Reply
  • MAKE ME A...

    Nice video, I need to watch more fusion 360 tutorials, I'm stuck on tinkercad and 3dbuilder, but I could make much better things with fusion 360.

    Reply
  • Mikko Haavisto

    Maker's Muse gives spiritual lectures 2:30

    Reply
  • RISK Channel

    Can you please check your Instagram DM from @dominik.rusnak. I have an important 3d printing related question

    Reply
  • paqrikaX

    I'm interested in toys, one of my next projects will be an articulated doll. I have sculpts that I created in Zbrush and I'm thinking of making the joints in CAD software (I'm not sure if I could get the tolerances right in Maya). Does it make sense to make the parts in Fusion 360 or another CAD software then bring in sections to connect to the arm in Maya, or can you bring OBJ's and weld pieces together in this software?

    Reply
  • Fluffball The Wizard

    Man, I guess I've still got some stuff to learn! I would always disregard dimensions because it looked "cleaner" and just do everything one time and almost start over if I needed to change something, but this is really helpful!

    Reply
  • Almujtaba O.

    "this is not a replacement for a university degree". I'm doing post grad and still learned a thing or two from this

    Reply
  • PalimpsestProd

    I've got one of those kits but it's a Staedtler in a plastic box.

    Reply
  • Néopium

    Is there a way to proportionally dimension your sketch? Like if I want to have a point set to 10% of the total length of a line, how would I do that ?
    I ask this because if I want to scale up my sketch, if I have hard set dimesion, it's not gonna scale up properly, so I need to have relative dimensions instead of absolute

    Reply
  • GFish 17

    please do more useful prints

    Reply
  • High Concept

    These are great videos. Nice one. I'm thinking of getting into Fusion and this is a great help. More please. Do you do CNC?

    Reply
  • LeMortso

    Good Vid Angus! You're a great teacher!

    Reply
  • Caleb Zenner

    Nice LTT sweatshirt dude

    Reply
  • Nik Saunders

    "Not meant to replace a University degree in 3D modelling". What I'm finding most frustrating about Uni is all the cool units I'd like to study but don't have time in my degree!

    Reply
  • Gaylord Livingston

    You are quite possibly one of the best 360 instructional video creators out there. Thanks.

    Reply
  • RexRoy

    Hello dude , I love your videos , I am building my first 3D printer , I am having 1 weird problem , how I can contact you?

    Reply
  • Niki Simply

    Love your videos! You got amazing camera presence! 🙂

    Reply
  • Fueanglada Srineul

    Hi – Thanks for the clear video… I am following adding a midpoint, however, I am always left with a red origin. I don't know why. Is there a reason? Thanks 🙂

    Reply
  • gzcwnk

    I cant find this as a series, Ie a logical sequence to follow

    Reply
  • Dag Eide

    Great tutorial, thanks a lot Angus. You are a gifted teacher !

    Reply
  • Mister Shledge

    Downloaded Fusion 360, would really like it if it didn't freeze every 2-3 minutes. Weird since 3Ds Max works perfectly.

    Reply
  • Pezmed

    Thank You Angus!

    Reply
  • Radeonr9280x A

    I still dont know how to do this 4:03 – 4:22 how many times do you click to do this this is the 6th video still cant do it.

    Reply
  • Le Bao Huong Tran

    This is a rectangle…*drag the corner around*…it doesn’t know what it wants to be in life. This hits hard unreasonably

    Reply
  • Bill LaDue

    Being total new to CAD I really appreciate you calling out the key strokes as your going along.

    Reply
  • Robert Shaver

    GREAT VIDEO. THANKS
    We did not do your drawings on grid paper. We started with a blank sheet, taped it down to our drafting board, drew on borders and a title block. Then we started the drawing. It looked like this:
    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/ad/Drafting_board_with_T_Square.jpg/640px-Drafting_board_with_T_Square.jpg

    Reply
  • TheKingDavid

    Is there a way to make a user parameter based on a driven dimension? that would really helpful.

    Reply
  • Kevin Duquette

    Excellent. I just bought Fusion 360 and am excited about using it. Off to the next video..

    Reply
  • Hal Roofner

    very informative. thank you

    Reply
  • Andy Meneely

    I found this to be very helpful. Thank you! You've got a gift for explaining things.

    Reply
  • Kevin Duquette

    I am trying to dimension from a line to a circle, but not to the middle of the circle. I am trying to dimension to the side of the circle, but not a tangent. What am I missing?

    Reply
  • Kevin Roach

    Great video! Please make more for us newbies!

    I have a question, is it best to sketch out like your doing before going to 3d? I am trying to draw a panel for a meter I built and I am having trouble with holes and setting dimensions and locating them on the panel etc.

    Reply
  • Otto Meeks

    Seriously you blew my mind. This video was so useful to me. You Rock!

    Reply
  • Asger Vestbjerg

    Thanks for sharing 🙂

    Reply
  • Adam

    I'm stuck at the fillets. The corners and edges of my cube are not selectable when I press F.

    Reply
  • K Cotton

    Ty for what ever reason you decided to make this tutorial. Two questions: what hardware are you using, and what software allows you to record view of yourself, simultaneously viewing the program you are operating in? Ty in advance.

    Reply
  • Michael R

    Thank You from Canada !

    Reply
  • Andrew Tessier

    Used autocad for a long time and simple as everything is drawn in place according to the 0,0 meanwhile fusion 360 makes you tell it where you want it. Man i hate that lol

    Reply
  • Terry Clair

    Thanks for this series!

    Reply
  • AWARHERO

    Lmao… Vintage… Guess i'm vintage too… Used these in college..

    Reply
  • Hans-Christian Schwartz

    Thank you. for someone doing the first steps of 3d design this really helps 🙂

    Reply
  • Dr Pipe

    What a thoughtful gift that is …I remember those times. Great work

    Reply
  • Cristian Samblás

    Thanks for sharing!

    Reply
  • Jesusreignonhigh

    Is there a standalone verion of Fusion 360?

    Reply
  • Seffdog1

    Man this vid was so helpful cheers 🤙

    Reply
  • Richard Woodard

    thank you I am new to all of this I just got a cnc plasma cutter and trying to learn how to program different shapes and disigns

    Reply
  • Aidan Gillett

    THANK YOU! This is EXACTLY the video I wanted. I can work my way around fusion but working out 'how' to dimension has been a huge sticking point for me, often resulting in a totally ruined part trying to account for 3d printer tolerances – adjust that 1 edge a couple millimeters and the whole thing spazzes out of proportion

    Reply
  • Dwayne Stimpson

    More please!! 🙂

    Reply
  • jeric_ synergy

    At 6:35, are you REMOVING the dimensions, or just hiding them?

    Reply
  • zumsel man

    It's my first day using Fusion 360 – thank you very much for this really helpful video! Your channel is amazing!

    Reply
  • Renee Mineart

    Hi. Am making the shift from Blender to Fusion360. Found this first video helpful, going to binge watch the rest now. Love the drafting set you were given. I had one back in the day before CAD (makes me sound older than I am). I helped introduce AutoCAD to a few bases in the US Air Force, and moved them from board drafting to CAD. Love it all, love your videos. Thanks.

    Reply
  • Pale Writer

    Wow – that drafting kit looks very much like MINE – except that my case is blue – which I still have from High School days! That and the triangular profile ruler with several different scales, a protractor, a 45-90 triangle and a 30-60 triangle, a T-square and drawing board and – WE WERE OFF! Pencil first, then india ink. Oh – forgot the eraser, eraser-bag for cleanup, graphite holder and sharpener – what was I THINKING! Had I a clue back then where AutoCAD and similar would be, my mind may have waited to melt down into a puddle of goo.

    Reply
  • Bikefarm Taiwan

    Thanks Angus! Very useful

    Reply
  • Ron Post

    Hi Angus. Just came across your videos and I'm quite interested in the Fusion 360 software. I'm currently using Sketchup Make but it has no parametric capabilities. I'm recently retired from a design career using Unigraphics & Siemens NX for the last 30 years and find the sketch capabilities and parametric control of this program very appealing. I'm looking to use this to design projects as a woodworking hobbyist. Would that qualify me for a free license or do I need to be a startup business?

    Reply
  • Clown Whisper

    DIMENSION goes gray all the time. I can not ever use it….

    Reply
  • John Middleditch

    Brilliant, thank you so much.

    Reply
  • Manish Singh

    What's the name of this CAD?

    Reply
  • Luong Lam

    Love your huge brain, keep it up dude!

    Reply
  • Ruben Pianegonda

    Some question here for using this tool to draw scientific drawings. Is it somewhat possible to rename the numbers as parameters? So you make an angle 45 degree to look good but you can call it alpha just to emphasize that it's changeable.

    Reply
  • broderp

    Frustrating like every other video on Fusion. The information is great, but as a noob to this software you skip some vital parts. Like one the lines are dimensioned you move the rectangle around to show its not locked. How did you get out of the dimension mode? Pressing D again? Stop Sketch? Something else? I an see the mouse pointer on your screen change back to the arrow where as mine stays with the dimension icon. When your in this mode (and I assume others you can't even move the image to recenter or anything. A very useful thing to know.

    So I figures out that Stop Sketch brings back the mouse pointer and I can move the rectangle around. Great, but now my dimension lines all disappear. WTH? I also see that when moving the object around you are still the sketch mode so this is maybe why my dimensions are gone. So I'm back to square one.

    Its these "detours" that really slow down the learning on this program that those who teach it seem to not realize. Fusion on a high level is very intuitive, but as they say the devil is in the details.

    Reply
  • Johnny Z

    Very good video , I am new to fusion 360 and I was having trouble with my angles . No I have a better understanding what went wrong . Please continue the videos your explanation of how things work and move is spot on

    Reply
  • philleskate

    hmm i dont have the dimension tool apperently???

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  • Clancy Clawson

    Who did the subtitles? He's saying fillets not phillips

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  • 1littlelee

    2years old new verdsion is VERY different!

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  • Ready Lace

    Thanks for your video, great content, efficient, and straight to the point 🙂

    Reply
  • Murry Gans

    Thanks, Angus. I have finally got familiar enough with Fusion 360 to need this and actually understand it.

    Reply
  • Josh Owens

    Can this program be used for CNC machine?

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  • Jeremy Westerman

    very good thank you!!!

    Reply
  • cbruijns

    Excellent video. Totally jealous of the drafting kit. I miss my days of drafting by hand on a drafting table. I might build one in the future. 🙂

    Reply

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