Deep Learning State of the Art (2019) – MIT


The thing I would very much like to talk about today is the state of the art in deep learning. Here we stand in 2019 really at the height of some of the great accomplishments that have happened. But also stand at the beginning. And it’s up to us to define where this incredible data-driven technology takes us. And so I’d like to talk a little bit about the breakthroughs that happened in 2017 and 2018 that take us to this point. So this lecture is not on the state of the art results on main machine learning benchmarks. So the various image classification and object detection or the NLP benchmarks or the GAN benchmarks. This isn’t about the cutting edge algorithm that’s available on github that performs best on a particular benchmark. This is about ideas ideas and developments that are at the cutting edge of what defines this exciting field of deep learning. And so I’d like to go through a bunch of different areas that I think they’re really exciting. Of course this is also not a lecture that’s complete There’s other things that may be totally missing that happened in 2017-18 that are particularly exciting to people here and people beyond. For example medical applications of deep learning is something I totally don’t touch on. And protein folding and all kinds of applications that there has been some exciting developments from deep mind and so on that don’t touch on. So forgive me if your favorite developments are missing but hopefully this encompasses some of the really fundamental things that have happened both on the theory side and the application side and then the community side of all of us being able to work together on this and these kinds of technologies. I think 2018 in terms of deep learning is the year of natural language processing. Many have described this year as the ImageNet moment. In 2012 for computer vision when AlexNet was the first neural network that really gave that big jump in performance. And computer vision it started to inspire people what’s possible with deep learning with purely learning based methods. In the same way there’s been a series of developments from 2016-17 led up to 18 with a development of BERT that has made on benchmarks and in our ability to apply NLP to solve various NLP tasks, natural language processing tasks a total leap. So let’s tell the story of what takes us there. There’s a few developments. I’ve mentioned a little bit on Monday about the encoder decoder or recurrent neural networks. So this idea of recurrent neural networks encode sequences of data and output something, output either a single prediction or another sequence. When the input sequence and the output sequence are not the same, necessarily the same size, they’re like in machine translation we have to translate from one language to another the encoder decoder architecture takes the following process. It takes in the sequence of words or the sequence of samples as the input and uses the recurrent units whether LSTM, GRU and beyond and encodes that sentence into a single vector. So forms an embedding of that sentence of what it represent, representation of that sentence. And then feeds that representation in the decoder recurrent neural network that then generates the sequence of words that form the sentence in the language that’s being translated to. So first you encode by taking the sequence and mapping it to a fixed size vector representation. And then you decode by taking that fixed size vector representation and unrolling it into the sentence that can be of different length than the input sentence. Okay that’s the encoder-decoder structure for recurrent neural networks has been very effective for machine translation and dealing with arbitrary length input sequences, arbitrary length output sequences. Next step attention. What is attention? Well it’s the next step beyond it’s an improvement on the the encoder-decoder architecture. It allows the, it provides a mechanism that allows to look back at the input sequence. So suppose to saying that you have a sequence that’s the input sentence and that all gets collapsed into a single vector representation. You’re allowed to look back at the particular samples from the input sequence as part of the decoding process. That’s attention and you can also learn which aspects are important for which aspects of the decoding process, which aspects the input sequence are important to the output sequence. Visualize in another way and there’s a few visualizations here. They’re quite incredible that are done by Jay Alammar. I highly recommend you follow the links and look at the further details of these visualizations of attention. So if we look at neural machine translation the encoder RNN takes a sequence of words and throughout, after every sequence forms a set of hidden representations, hidden state that captures the representation of the worlds that followed. And those sets of hidden representations as opposed to being collapsed to a single fixed size vector, are then all pushed forward to the decoder. That are then used by the decoder to translate but in a selective way. Where the decoder here visualized on the y-axis the input language and on the X the output language the decoder weighs the different parts of the input sequence differently in order to determine how to best translate generate the word that forms a translation in the full output sentence. Okay that’s attention, allowing expanding the encoder-decoder architecture to allow for selective attention to the input sequence as opposed to collapsing everything down into fixed representation. Okay next step self-attention. In the encoding process allowing the encoder to also selectively look informing the hidden representations at other parts of the input sequence in order to form those representations. It allows you to determine for certain words. What are the important relevant aspects of the input sequence that can help you encode that word the best? So it improves the encoder process by allowing it to look at the entirety of the context. That’s self-attention. Building a transformer. It’s using the self attention mechanism in the encoder to form these sets of representations on the input sequence. And then as part of the decoding process follow the same but in reverse with a bunch of self-attention that’s able to look back again. So it’s self attention on the encoder attention on the decoder and that’s where the magic, that’s where the entirety magic is. That’s able to capture the rich context of the input sequence in order to generate in the contextual way the output sequence. So let’s take a step back then and look at what is critical to natural language in order to be able to reason about words, construct a language model and be able to reason about the words in order to classify a sentence or translate a sentence or compare two sentences and so on. There the sentences are collections of words or characters and those characters and words have to have an efficient representation that’s meaningful for that kind of understanding. And that’s what the process of embedding is. We talked a little bit about it on Monday. And so the traditional Word2Vec  process of embedding is you use some kind of trick in an unsupervised way to map words into into a compressed representation. So language modeling is the process of determining which words follow each other usually. So one way you can use it as in a skip gram model taking a huge datasets of words you know, there’s writing all over the place taking those datasets and feeding a neural network that in a supervised way looks at which words are usually follow the input. So the input is a word the output is which word are statistically likely to follow that word. And the same with the preceding word. And doing this kind of unsupervised learning if you throw away the output and the input and just taking the hidden representation form in the middle that’s how you form this compressed embedding a meaningful representation that when two words are related in a language modeling sense, two words that are related they’re going to be in that representation close to each other. And when they’re totally unrelated have nothing to do with each other they’re far away ELMo is the approach of using bi-directional L STMs to learn that representation. And what bi-directional, bi-directionally? So looking not just the sequence that let up to the word but in both directions the sequence that following, the sequence that before. And that allows you to learn the rich full context of the word. In learning the rich full context of the word you’re forming representations that are much better able to represent the statistical language model behind the kind of corpus of language that you’re you’re looking at. And this has taken a big leap in ability to then that for further algorithms then with the language model a reasoning about doing things like sentence classification, sentence comparison, so on. Translation that representation is much more effective for working with language. The idea of the OpenAI transformer is the next step forward is taking the the same transformer that I mentioned previously. The encoder with self-attention decoder with attention looking back at the input sequence. And using, taking the language learned by the decoder and using that as a language model and then chopping off layers and training in a specific on a specific language tasks like sentence classification. Now BERT is the thing that did the big leap in performance. With the transformer formulation there is always there’s no bi-directional element. There is, it’s always moving forward. So the encoding step and the decoding step with BERT is it’s richly bi-directional it takes in the full sequence of the sentence and masks out some percentage of the words, 15% of the words. 15% of the samples of tokens from the sequence. And tasks the entire encoding self-attention mechanism to predict the words that are missing. That construct and then you stack a ton of them together. A ton of those encoders self-attention feed-forward network, self attention feed forward network together. And that allows you to learn the rich context of the language to then at the end perform all kinds of tasks. You can create first of all, like Elmo and like Word2Vec, create rich contextual embeddings. Take a set of words and represent them in the space that’s very efficient to reason with. You can do language classification, you can do settings pair classification, you can do the similarity of two sentences, multiple choice question answering, general question answering, tagging of sentences. okay I’ll link it on that one a little bit too long. but it is also the one I’m really excited about and really if there’s a breakthrough this year is been it’s thanks to BERT. The other thing I’m very excited about is totally jumping away from the new rips, the theory, those kind of academic developments and deep learning and into the world of applied deep learning. So Tesla has a system called Autopilot where the hardware version 2 of that system is a newer  implementation of the NVIDIA Drive PX 2 system which runs a ton of neural networks. There’s 8 cameras on the car and a variant of the inception network is now taking in all a cameras at different resolutions as input and performing various tasks, like drivable area segmentation, like object detection and some basic localization tasks. So you have now a huge fleet of vehicles where it’s not engineers some I’m sure engineers but it’s really regular consumers, people that have purchased the car have no understanding in many cases of what neural networks limitations the capabilities are so on. Now it has a neural network is controlling the well being has its decisions, its perceptions and the control decisions based on those perceptions are controlling the life of a human being. And that to me is one of the great breakthroughs of 17 and 18. In terms of the development of what AI can do in a practical sense in impacting the world. And so one billion miles over 1 billion miles have been driven in Autopilot. Now there’s two types of systems in currently operating in Tesla’s. .There’s hardware version 1, hardware version 2. Hardware version 1 was Intel Mobileye monocular camera perception system. As far as we know that was not using a neural network. And it was a fix system. That wasn’t learning, at least online learning in the Tesla’s. The other is hardware version 2 and it’s about half and half now in terms of the miles driven. The hardware version 2 has a neural network that’s always learning. There’s weekly updates. It’s always improving the model shipping new weights and so on. That’s the exciting set of breakthroughs in terms of AutoML, the dream of automating some aspects or all aspects or many aspects as possible of the machine learning process where you can just drop in a dataset that you’re working on and the system will automatically determine all the parameters from the details of the architectures, the size are the architecture, the different modules and then architecture the hyper parameters use for training the architecture running that they’re doing the inference everything. All is done for you. All you just feed it is data So that’s been the success of the neural architecture search in 16 and 17. And there’s been a few ideas with Google AutoML that’s really trying to almost create an API we just drop in data set. And it’s using reinforcement learning and recurrent neural networks to given a few modules, stitch them together in such a way where the objective function is optimizing the performance of the overall system. And they’ve showed a lot of exciting results. Google showed and others that outperform state of art systems both in terms of efficiency and in terms of accuracy. Now in 18 there’ve been a few improvements on this direction and one of them is a AdaNet where it’s now using the same reinforcement learning AutoML formulation to build ensembles on your network. So in many cases state-of-the-art performance can be achieved by as opposed to taking a single architecture, is building up a multitude and ensemble a collection of architectures. And that’s what is doing here is given candidate architectures, stitching them together to form an ensemble to get state-of-the-art performance. Now that state of the art performance is not a leap a breakthrough leap forward but it’s nevertheless a step forward. And it’s a very exciting field that’s going to be receiving more and more attention. There’s an area of machine learning that’s heavily under studied and I think it’s extremely exciting area. And if you look at 2012 with AlexNet achieving the breakthrough performance of showing what deep learning networks are capable of. From that point, from 2012 to today there’s been non-stop extremely active developments of different architectures that even on just ImageNet alone on doing the image classification task have improved performance over and over and over with totally new ideas. Now on the other side on the data side there’s been very few ideas about how to do data augmentation. So data augmentation is the process of, you know, it’s what kids always do when you learn about an object right? You look at an object and you kind of like twist it around is is taking the raw data and messing it in such a way that it can give you much richer representation of what this can this data can look like in other forms in other contexts in the real world. There’s been very few developments I think still and there’s this AutoAugment is just a step a tiny step into that direction that I hope that we as a community invest a lot of effort in. So what AutoAugment does? As it says, ok, so there’s these data augmentation methods like translating the image, sharing the image, doing color manipulation like color inversion. Let’s take those as basic actions you can take and then use reinforcement learning and an RNN again construct to stitch those actions together in such a way that can augment data like an ImageNet, you train on the data, it gets state-of-the-art performance. So mess with the data in a way that optimizes the way you mess with the data. So. And then they’ve also showed that given that the set of data augmentation policies that are learned to optimize for example for ImageNet given the some kind of architecture you can take that learn the set of policies for data augmentation and apply it to a totally different dataset. So there’s the process of transfer learning. So what is transfer learning? We talked about transfer learning, you have a neural network that learns to do cat versus dog or no learns to do a thousand class classification problem on image. And then you transfer, you chop off few layers and you transfer on the task of your own dataset of cat versus dog. What you’re transferring is the weights that are learned on the ImageNet classification task. And now you’re then fine-tuning those weights on the specific, personal cat vs. dog dataset you have. Now you can do the same thing here. You can transfer as part of the transfer learning process, take the data augmentation policies learned on ImageNet, and transfer those. You can transfer both the weights and the policies. That’s a really super exciting idea I think. It wasn’t quite demonstrated extremely well here in terms of performance, so it got an improvement in performance and so on, but any kind of inspired an idea that’s something that we need to really think about. How to augment data in an interesting way such that given just a few samples of data? We can generate huge data sets in a way that you can then form meaningful complex rich representations from. I think that’s really exciting in one of the ways that you break open the problem of how do we learn a lot from a little. Training deep neural networks with synthetic data. This also really an exciting topic that a few groups but especially NVIDIA invested a lot in. Here’s a from a CVPR2018 probably my favorite work on this topic is they really went crazy and said ok let’s mess with synthetic data in every way we could possibly can. So on the left there’re shown a set of backgrounds then there’s also a set of artificial objects and you have a car or some kind of object that you’re trying to classify. So let’s take that car and mess with it with every way possible. Apply lighting variation to whatever way possible, rotate everything that is crazy so what NVIDIA is really good at is creating realistic scenes. And they said okay let’s create realistic scenes but let’s also go away aboveboard and not do realistic at all. Do things that can’t possibly happen in reality. And so generally these huge datasets I want to train and again achieve quite interesting quite a quite good performance on image classification. Of course they’re trying to apply  to ImageNet and so on these kinds of tasks, you’re not going to outperform networks that were trained on ImageNet. But they show that with just a small sample from from those real images they can fine tune this network train on synthetic images, totally fake images to achieve state of the art performance. Again another way to generate, to get, to learn a lot for very little by generating fake worlds synthetically. The process of annotation which for supervised learning is what you need to do in order to train the network, you need to be able to provide ground truth, you need to be able to label whatever the entity that is being learned. And so for image classification that’s saying what is going on in the image. And part of that was done on ImageNet by doing a Google search for creating candidates. Now saying what’s going on in the image is a pretty easy tasks. Then there is the object detection task of detecting the boundary box. And so saying drawing the actual boundary box is a little bit more difficult but it’s a couple of clicks and so on. Then if we take the finals the probably one of the higher complexity tasks of perception of image understanding is segmentation. It’s actually drawing either pixel level or polygons the outline of particular object. Now if you have to annotate that that’s extremely costly. So the work with Polygon-RNN is to use recurrent neural networks to make suggestions for polygons. It’s really interesting. There’s a few tricks to form these high-resolution polygons. So the idea is it drops in a single point you draw a boundary box around an object. You use convolutional neural networks to drop the first point. And then use recurrent neural networks to draw around it. And the performance is really good There’s a few tricks and this tool is available online. It’s a really interesting idea again the dream with AutoML is to remove the human from the picture as much as possible. With data augmentation remove the human from the picture as much as possible for a menial data. Automate the boring stuff and in this case the act of drawing a polygon tried to automated as much as possible. The interesting other dimension along which deep learning is recently being trying to be optimized is how do we make deep learning accessible. Fast, cheap, accessible. So the DAWNBench from Stanford the benchmark the DAWNBench benchmark from Stanford asked formulated an interesting competition, which got a lot of attention and a lot of progress. It’s saying if we want to achieve 93% accuracy on ImageNet and 94% on CIFAR10, let’s now compete, that’s like the requirement, let’s now compete how you can do it in the least amount of time and for the least amount of dollars. Do the training in the least amount of time and the training in the least amount of dollars like literally dollars you are allowed to spend to do this. And fast AI you know it’s a renegade awesome renegade group of deep learning researchers have been able to train on ImageNet in 3 hours. So this is for training process for 25 bucks. So training a network that achieves 93% accuracy for 25 bucks, and 94% accuracy for 26 cents on CIFAR10. So the key idea that they were playing with is quite simple. But really boils down to messing with the learning rate throughout the process of training. So the learning rate is how much you based on the loss function based on the error the neural network observes, how much do you adjust the weights. So they found that if they crank up the learning rate while decreasing the momentum, which is a parameter of the optimization process, and they do it that jointly they’re able to make the network learn really fast. That’s really exciting and the benchmark itself is also really exciting because that’s exactly for people sitting in this room that opens up the door to doing all kinds of fundamental deep learning problems without the resources of Google DeepMind or OpenAI or Facebook or so on, without computational resources. That’s important for academia that’s important for independent researchers and so on. So GANs. There’s been a lot of work on generative adversarial neural networks. And in some ways there has not been breakthrough ideas in GANs for quite a bit. And I think began from Google DeepMind an ability to generate incredibly high-resolution images. And it’s the same GAN technique, so in terms of breakthroughs and innovations but scaled. So the increase the model capacity and increase the the batch size the number of images that are fed that are fed to the network. It produces incredible images I encourage you to go online and and look at them It’s hard to believe that they’re generated. So that was 2018 for GANs was a year of scaling and parameter tuning as opposed to breakthrough new ideas. Video-to-Video Synthesis. This work is from NVIDIA is looking at the problem so there’s been a lot of work on general going from image to image. So from a particular image generating another image. So whether it’s colorizing an image or just to traditionally define GANs. The idea with video to video synthesis that a few people have been working on but NVIDIA took a good step forward is to make the video to make the temporal consistency the temporal dynamics part of the optimization process. So make it look not jumpy. So if you look here at the comparison the for this particular. So the input is the labels on the top left and the output of the of the NVIDIA approach is on the bottom right. See it’s temper it’s very temporarily consistent. If you look at the image to image mapping that’s that state the pix2pixHD. It’s very jumpy, it’s not temporally consistent at all. And there’s some naive approaches for trying to maintain temporal consistency. That’s in the bottom left. So you can apply this to all kinds of tasks all kinds of video to video mapping. Here is mapping it to face edges. Edge detection on faces mapping it to faces. Generating faces from just edges. You can look at body pose to actual images. As an input to the network you can take the pose of the person and generate the  video of the person. Okay semantic segmentation. The problem of perception, so if began with AlexNet and ImageNet has been further and further developments where the input, the problem is of basic image classification, where the input is an image and the output is a classification was going on in that image and the fundamental architecture can be reused for more complex tasks like detection like segmentation and so on, interpreting what’s going on in the image. So these large networks from VGGNet, GoogLeNet, ResNet, SENet, DenseNet all these networks are forming rich representations that can then be used for all kinds of tasks whether that task is object detection. This here shown is the region based methods where the neural network is tasked the convolutional layers make region proposals. So much of candidates to be considered. And then there’s a step that’s determining what’s in those different regions and forming boundary boxes around them in a for-loop way. And then there is the one-shot method single-shot method where in a single pass all of the boundary boxes in their classes generated. And there has been a tremendous amount of work in the space of object detection. Some are single shot method, some are region based methods. And there’s been a lot of exciting work but not more not I would say breakthrough ideas. And then we take it to the highest level of perception which is semantic segmentation. There’s also been a lot of work there the state of the art performance is at least for the open source systems is DeepLabv3+ on the PASCAL VOC challenge. So semantic segmentation and catch it all up started 2014 with fully convolution neural networks. Chopping off the fully connected layers and then outputting the heatmap very grainy very low resolution. Then improving that was SegNet performing maxpooling with a breakthrough idea that’s reused in a lot of cases is Dilated Convolution, Atrous convolutions having some spacing which increases the field of view of the convolutional filter. The key idea behind DeepLabv3 that is the state of the art is the multi-scale processing. Without increasing the parameters the multi scale is achieved by the “atrous rate” So taking those atrous convolutions and increasing the spacing. And you can think of the increasing that spacing by enlarging the model’s field of view. And so you can consider all these different scales of processing and looking at the at the layers of features. So allowing you to be able to grasp the greater context as part of the upsampling deconvolutional step. And that’s what’s produced in the state of art performances and that’s where we have the tutorial on github showing this DeepLab architecture trained on CityScapes. CityScapes is a driving segmentation data set that is one of the most commonly used for the task of driving scene segmentation. Okay on the deep reinforcement learning for. So this is touching a bit a bit on the 2017. But i think the excitement really settled in 2018 as the work from Google and from OpenAI, DeepMind. So it started in DQN paper from Google DeepMind where they beat a bunch of a bunch of Atari games achieving superhuman performance with deep reinforcement learning methods. That are taking in just the raw pixels of the game, so the same kind of architecture is able to learn how to beat these, how to beat these games. Super exciting idea that kind of has echoes of what general intelligence is. Taking in the raw raw information and being able to understand the game, the sort of physics of the game sufficient to be able to beat it. Then in 2016 AlphaGo with some supervision and some playing against itself, self play, some supervised learning on expert world champ players and some self play where it plays against itself was able to beat the top of the world champion at Go. And then 2017 AlphaGo Zero a specialized version of Alpha Zero was able to beat the AlphaGo with just a few days of training. and zero supervision from expert games. So through the process of self play again this is kind of getting the human out of the picture more and more and more which is why Alpha Zero is probably or this AlphaGo Zero was the demonstration of the cleanest demonstration of all the nice progress in deep reinforcement learning. I think if we look at the history of AI when you’re sitting on a porch hundred years from now sort of reminiscing back Alpha Zero will be a thing that people will remember as an interesting moment in time, as a key moment in time. And Alpha Zero was applied in 2017 to beat. Alpha Zero paper was in 2017 and it was this year played StockFish in chess which is the best engine, chess playing engines is able to beat it with just four hours of training of course the four hours this caveat. Because four hours for Google DeepMind is highly distributed training. So it’s not four hours for an undergraduate student sitting in their dorm room. But meaning it was able to self play to very quickly learn to beat the state of the art chess engine. And learned to beat the state of the art Shogi engine Elmo. And the interesting thing here is you know with perfect information games like chess you have a tree and you have all the decisions you could possibly make and so the farther along you look at along that tree presumably the better you do. That’s how DeepBlue beat Kasparov in the 90s is you just look as far as possible in a down the tree to determine which is the action is the most optimal. If you look at the way human grandmasters think it certainly doesn’t feel like they’re like looking down a tree. There’s something like creative intuition there’s something like you can see the patterns in the board, you can do a few calculations but really it’s an order of hundreds. It’s not on the order of millions or billions which is kind of the the StockFish the state of the art chess engine approach. And Alpha Zero is moving closer and closer closer towards the human grandmaster concerning very few future moves. It’s able through the neural network estimator that’s estimating the quality of the move and the quality of the different, the current quality of the board and and the quality of the moves that follow. It’s able to do much much less look ahead. So the neural network learns the fundamental information just like when a grandmaster looks at a board they can tell how good that is. So that’s again interesting, it’s a step towards at least echoes of what human intelligence is in this very structured formal constrained world of chess and go and shogi. And then there’s the other side of the world that’s messy. It’s still games. It’s still constrained in that way but OpenAI has taken on the challenge of playing games that are much messier to have this resemblance of the real world and the fact that you have to do teamwork, you have to look at long time horizons with huge amounts of imperfect information, hidden information, uncertainty. So within that world they’ve taken on the challenge of a popular game Dota 2. On the human side of that there’s the competition the international hosted every year where you know in 2018 the winning team gets 11 million dollars. So it’s a very popular very active competition has been going on for a few years. They’ve been improving and it achieved a lot of interesting milestones in 2017. Their 1v1 bot beat the top professional Dota 2 player. The way you achieve great things is as you try. And in 2018 they tried to go 5v5. The OpenAI team lost two games a go against the top Dota 2 players at the 2018 international. And of course their ranking here the MMR ranking in Dota 2 has been increasing over and over but there’s a lot of challenges here that make it extremely difficult. To beat the human players and this is, you know, in every story rocky or whatever you think about losing is essential element of a story that leads to then a movie in a book and the greatness. So you better believe that they’re coming back next year. And there’s going to be a lot of exciting developments there. It also, Dota 2 and this particular video game makes it currently this really two games that have the public eye in terms of AI taking on his benchmarks. So we saw go incredible accomplishment What’s next? So last year the associate were the best paper in Europe’s. There was the heads up Texas No Limit Hold’em AI was able to beat the top level players was completely current well not completely but currently out of reach is the general not heads up one versus one but the general team Texas No Limit Hold’em here you go. And on the gaming side this dream of Dota 2 now that’s the benchmark that everybody’s targeting. And it’s actually incredibly difficult one and some people think would be a long time before we can win. And on the more practical side of things the 2018, start in 2017 has been a year of of the frameworks growing up of maturing and creating ecosystems around them. With TensorFlow with the history there dating back a few years has really with TensorFlow 1.0 as come to be sort of a mature framework PyTorch 1.0 came out 2018 is matured as well. And now the really exciting developments in the TensorFlow with the eager execution and beyond that’s coming out TensorFlow 2.0 in in 2019. So really those two players have made incredible leaps in standardizing deep learning. In the fact that a lot of the ideas I talked about today and Monday and we’ll keep talking about are all have a github repository with implementations in TensorFlow and PyTorch. Making extremely accessible and that’s really exciting. it’s probably best to quote Geoff Hinton the “Godfather” of deep learning, one of the key people behind backpropagation said recently on backpropagation is “My view is throw it all away and start again” His believes backpropagation is totally broken and an idea that has ancient and it needs to be completely revolutionized and the practical protocol for doing that is he said the future depends on some graduate student who’s deeply suspicious of everything I’ve said that’s probably a good way to end the discussion about what the state of the art in deep learning holds because everything we’re doing is fundamentally based on ideas from the 60s and the 80s and really in terms of new ideas, there has not been many new ideas especially the state of the art results that I’ve mentioned are all based on fundamentally, on stochastic gradient descent and backpropagation. It’s ripe for totally new ideas. So it’s up to us to define the real breakthroughs and the real state of the art 2019 and beyond. So that I’d like to thank you and the stuff is on the website deeplearning.mit.edu.

49 comments

  • Muhammad Usman

    First

    Reply
  • DMeister

    Thanks Lex!

    Reply
  • Muhammad Usman

    🤓👍🏻 thanks

    Reply
  • Lex Fridman

    I'm excited about recent developments in NLP, deep RL, speeding up training/inference, big GANs, powerful DL frameworks, and real-world application of DL in driving 370k+ Tesla HW2 cars! What else would you like to see covered?

    Reply
  • Alien Machine

    Didn't understand much. But I'm excited. Moving forwards.

    Reply
  • lonwulf0

    Super talk, keep up the good job.

    Reply
  • Luke Pritchard

    Amazing content Lex, always very informative to help filter the firehose of research papers.

    Reply
  • Jens D

    Thanks for the lecture. Also, well edited (erasing pauses). Funny to see you transform to Men in Blue compared to when you started the lecture two years ago. Looking good

    Reply
  • Jens D

    Thanks for the lecture. Also, well edited (erasing pauses). Funny to see you transform to Men in Blue compared to when you started the lecture two years ago. Looking good

    Reply
  • Jousef Murad

    Thanks a ton Lex! You're one of the guys who brought me from Mech. Engineering to AI 🙂

    Reply
  • Volker Schneider

    So funny how Lex refers to the fast.ai folks as renegade reserchers 😀

    Reply
  • Yufeng Wang

    awesome !!!

    Reply
  • Severin Bratus

    Mаgnificent!

    Reply
  • Tamas Mihaly

    No "Ums" and "Aws" for Lex. Good speaker.

    Reply
  • William Taylor

    This is fantastic. I am trying to create a storytelling system using LSTM s and a corpus of self-written works. Thank you for this Mr. Fridman.

    Reply
  • YuJin Dev

    GOOD Thanks a lot !

    Reply
  • ADEEL MUHAMMAD

    Would you please make a video detailed lecture on computer vision and algorithm for real time tracking applications?

    Reply
  • SamT

    Multi scale processing seems a great baseline

    Reply
  • Parag Kulkarni

    No nonsense AI from Lex

    Reply
  • swapnil meshram

    thanks lex

    Reply
  • Raphael

    Is there a way to solve the need for so much data?

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  • Ivan Shkurak

    It would be great if you add to description links from the presentation!

    Reply
  • Valliken Haven

    This is attempting computational expression! It inhibits natural inherent algorithmic processing. Human is an emotional cognitive being. Whether it be locution or calculation, induction/deduction is based on emotional cognitive aptitude, therewith conflict with the attempt of mimicking sterile computation and natural anatomization. I have watched from afar and Chomsky is aware who I am… ( ^V^ ) If human continues to use technology without the comprehension that tech creates an ersatz structure, than human will fall deeper and deeper into a form of psychosis. Love to ALL

    Reply
  • Alaa A Latif

    Great review on recent advance in deep learning! Would be great to see a similar review of current (immediate) challenges e.g. limited numerical extrapolation abilities, multi-task learning…etc.

    Reply
  • MindSET

    36:00

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  • Leo ley

    BLOW MIND!!!!. I have a question. To simulate the human brain you also may need to simulated the human body because many of those connection I believe comes from the organs that the brain is sustaining to keep it alive. Plus in the human body depending of the blood flow, the toxin of the blood, the well of the organs, the air that the lung use, almost everything on the organ affect the function of the brain work. Plus, with the 100 billion neuron with more than 1 trillion connection in the brain. SO, do you think that after all that research of the human connection it also has to be done a research of the human body to simulate inside a computer?.

    Reply
  • Gn Adri

    I was absolutely shocked by how brilliant these approaches to deep learning where. I'm absolutely excited to see what we can come up with next

    Reply
  • Johnnie Fujita

    adanet is very interesting! that is a very good material on progressive learning for data scarse situation! also multiple classification in rounds… and one on confusion for fine grain classifications without augmentation!

    Reply
  • Self Aware Devices / Bilinçli Cihazlar

    multi complex layer systems are the future, they can be called deep complex neural networks. what I mean by that is, on each layer (to accelerate processing, inference or probable future AI applications) it is possible to train the same dataset for many different inputs, for example, it is possible to train a dataset with a video file, equipped with IMU data, with MIC input and system can learn, what type of orientation of the IMU can cause audio level breaks and what type of high-speed angle changes can cause over or under exposures. we are working on those issues with HDR capable sensors to get always-perfect image and near-perfect audio with mutiple level microphone inputs. similar techniques can be applied to autonomous driving, medical robots or self driving rovers on moon or mars.

    Reply
  • TSR

    Does anyone know what technology amazon textract uses?

    Reply
  • 徐志强

    Very happy to see the prosperity of deep learning. I hope I can excavate the biggest potential of DL in the field of computational advertising.

    Reply
  • Callam Ingram

    If this lecture is over my head and I need a little more knowledge about the fundamental concepts where should I look for that?

    Reply
  • Bob Salita

    Thanks for the video. It will be the primary resource for our event: https://www.meetup.com/Paris-Machine-Learning-Study-Group-in-English-Meetup/events/tlzcqqyzdbhb/

    Reply
  • 輝夜雪

    I think he speeks more faster than before

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  • 이인섭

    31:53 Baam!!!!!!

    Reply
  • Shyamal S. Chandra

    I see a hand-waving review of acronyms and no step-by-step tracing of algorithms. No substance. NeXT!

    Reply
  • movax20h

    So, the AutoAugment is about augmentation of worst possible inputs? Like you try to do augmented ops that are hardest to recognize correctly thus force network to learn them better?

    Reply
  • Mert Aydin

    This is the most valuable thing that I saw in 2019.

    Reply
  • Saidakbar P

    Lex's summary is so true:
    Stochastic gradient descent and backpropagation are still backbones of the current state of the art AI techniques. Therefore, we need some innovations to see leaps in the field.
    Thank you Lex!

    Reply
  • Dan Dekker

    Dressing like the men in black isn't helping….

    Reply
  • Andrei Dyomin

    "The way you achieve great things is you try."
     — Lex Fridman

    Reply
  • derasor

    It could be very insightful to go back to this talk in a couple of years time, and see how these ideas developped.

    Reply
  • igor.

    Awesome video. Are there good links to videos on other developments not mentioned, e.g. in healthcare and agriculture?

    Reply
  • Sergio

    This guy have the same voice that the Breaking Bad's actor, Jesse Pinkman.

    Reply
  • Pratik Kala

    This is the most valuable thing that I saw in 2019.
    This guy have the same voice that the Breaking Bad's actor, Jesse Pinkman.

    Reply
  • Prabhudatta Das

    Thank you Lex !! Always great to learn from you

    Reply
  • skierpage

    45:06 I am a student deeply suspicious of everything Geoff Hinton has said. The future depends on me. I am John Connor.

    Reply
  • Ku Qiu

    I only completed watching this video because I think he is charming.

    Reply
  • Moses Wong

    We should not "throw it all away and start over" as Hinton suggested, I am totally against this idea. For one thing, we have no prove whether back-propagation is not there since we have very limited understandings of how the human brain works, and recent advancement of Deep Learning proves that it simply works and works exceedingly well in many domains, so the world should thrown in more resources and do whatever possible to exploit these 60's and 80's good tricks, on the other hand, we should be deeply suspicious everything Hinton said (as he suggested) because we know Machine Learning is rooted on something fundamentally limited itself, be it "XOR-problem", lack of rule-based AI capabilities, explanation etc and come up with with radically new different approaches for address new problems. P.S. For my first point, I am actually applying Hinton's second statement onto his first statement.

    Reply

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