48 comments

  • Sharpshooterjoe

    It's a good cause and i enjoyed the lecture, but out of everything i absolutely love the match me game. Cheap, fun, safe, and teaches whats not to like about the idea.

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  • Brodiz

    This is really great project, I come from a rural area myself and I would have loved to have something like this in place when I was growing up.

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  • TheDiscoMole

    @BBthzPrisonerOfWar *your

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  • TheDiscoMole

    That's what a school is supposed to look like

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  • Kish

    @TheDiscoMole *grammar nazi

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  • Freigeist 20789

    @BBthzPrisonerOfWar people like you inhibit mankind

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  • Billy Campbell

    design, build and educate the simple things are global when it all falls down
    we will need rural food production more than Farmville

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  • notme222

    12:45: "Arduous and totally convoluted process of getting certified as high school teachers". – Does that maybe seem like a problem?

    Not to get political but the "Left" solution always seems to be "spend money to make graphics and build pretty things" – which is what they did here. And sometimes infrastructure needs are real. But those same people tend to mock the Conservate point that bureaucracy often gets in the way. Yet clearly…

    Anyway, nice talk but it needs more takeaway. B-

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  • House Uberaht

    Don't rebuild the ghetto! All they gonna do is try to break it down again. Just do your drugs, sell them, make money, don't strive for education, get caught up in the system, be a fuck up for the rest of your life. That's what you're supposed to be. Stay right where you're supposed to be or else! Lol ( sarcasm)

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  • bluefootedpig

    @notme222 I completely agree, if you live in a big city, with a huge population of teachers, then sure, certification can be great as a sort of filtering method. But for these small cities where they would take just about any teacher they could find, it just makes it more difficult. Not to mention the cost of schooling and how that little city can't even really pay enough for a teacher to pay off student loans.

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  • chas ames

    A good series of talks lately.
    I hope TED can keep up this momentum.

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  • expendedAmmunition

    Chip Zullinger was superintendent in Manassas. He got fired. Google it.

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  • Terraqueous

    "African American"
    No, you're Chinese-Filipino-Korean-American.
    See how stupid that is?
    They didn't come from Africa.
    Don't call them that.

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  • gero1369

    This type of thing should be done everywhere!

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  • kommaV

    Am I wrong in assuming that this model worked because it was a small city and mainly because the people were open to experimentation. The parents didnt mind about the creative way in which education was delivered and ofcourse as she says "..creating the conditions under which change is possible.", Bertie community has an ecosystem that accepts change, may be perhaps thanks to Dr. Z and the students are being educated by the sense of a purpose of giving back to the community which is… Cool!!

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  • Guillermo Casanova

    Freakin' love this design!

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  • Duong Nguyen

    @Tpar1234 63% of Americans can be considered obese.. so it's not like they are alone.. It's an epidemic in America and the first world and no one knows why? Maybe its HFCS , maybe an endocrine disruptor, or maybe people just don't exercise anymore?.. There are alot of theories..

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  • WorldlyMusi

    Wow. America sounds like Africa… (especially that tire play ground design)
    What a sad world

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  • Terraqueous

    @mmballa No, I'm simply guessing her lineage. I deplore racism.

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  • wickedinsight

    this had nothing to do with design but good job anyways

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  • Peter Tanham

    Skip to 7:30 for the interesting part

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  • Duong Nguyen

    @Tpar1234 I don't get you, are you saying you need to seek help? for your self centered nature? Oh you meant me? The irony! Hahaha ohh.. 😛

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  • TheEyesOfNye

    @Aresftfun But they did come from Africa, maybe not them personally but their ancestors did. In fact we're all African-somethings, we all come from East Africa. Besides it's just semantics, why do people get so worked up over it? "They're not black they're African-American!" "They're not African-America, they're black!" 'No one is 'black' they're brown!" It's like give it a rest, we know what you all mean.

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  • Terraqueous

    @TheEyesOfNye So don't want anyone to talk about problems and silly things with society? please

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  • gulllars

    @Aresftfun agreed. Calling them by an approximation to skin color, or if first or second generation immigrants by their family's origin country/continent makes more sense. Fear of racism makes people use words that are unnatural and ridiculus.
    With regards to the pictures in the book, it makes a lot more sense to refer to the students as black and white. While it's not literary or politically correct, it's coloqually instantly understandable, and a lot easier to work with.

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  • NickBlackDIN

    @Aresftfun relax, I know what you mean, and I agree with you, but it's just a polite way of saying "black/dark skinned people"

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  • TheDentist27

    Simple solution to education:

    1. Pay students for passing the tests.
    2. Record lectures so you're not wasting money on repetitive lecturing
    3. Used the saved money in 2. for 1.

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  • GrimSoul66

    @palaiding Asian.. like Russian? Doesn't fit the bill.

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  • Terraqueous

    @PisicutaSiMatei I know but that's the point. An black person could have ancestors from Ireland and be called "African-American" which would be politically incorrect, and the whole stature of political correctness is very silly.

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  • tony fuca

    @Aresftfun all she did was pick a phrase she felt was unoffensive. comments like this only distract people from the message of the lecture.

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  • Michał Ty

    @Aresftfun African-American is a name, not a description.

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  • clearstatic

    @Aresftfun there's still a need for people to distinguish others based not only on physical traits but also on color. Since some people think Black isn't p.c, then they use African American, even when the person isn't of African descent.

    I think it's pathetic that we still find the need to distinguish between humans, and I don't think there's a problem describing someone as "black", or as "red-headed" because those physically describe a person. African-american doesn't help me much.

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  • Terraqueous

    @andresico2 I completely agree.

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  • Say Chickpeas

    @TheDentist27 The value of being engaged in learning vastly dwarfs the value of any money paid for achievement. Lectures are not an engaging learning style for young people, recorded lectures even less so. Hands-on involvement and practical applications of principals nurture the playful spirit which young people thrive upon. That cannot be replaced by a check. This TED talk is a great example of how to help youth be invested in their own achievements by adding value to their communities.

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  • TheDentist27

    @SayChickpeas that's a separate issue, tutoring. I'm not against that. I am against a teacher standing infront of the room for an hour talking to him or herself. I went through many, many, years of it.

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  • sukanasturtle

    wow, if you just look past the race comments she made (which i know she had no bad intentions of), this talk is amazing

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  • Terraqueous

    @mmballa And what about the side of white heritage? Should they not be called European-African-American?
    Or Anglo-African-American?
    Is it unneeded for there to be a European show of respect because Africa needs it? What is the requirement for having a continent in your label?

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  • Terraqueous

    @mmballa And averagely the default usage in speaking is to call them "African American" in courts and news and other formal areas, while most of the Black population prefers to be called black or just that no one is labeled by their skin color.

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  • Leonidas GGG

    I liked this a lot. Almost made me wanna go back to school… almost 😛

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  • AlcoholLevel

    kids learning multiplication in a playground filled with worn-out tires… I'm sure they'll be competing on the international stage one day……………………………..

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  • Terraqueous

    @theprofits13 It's a pet peeve.

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  • sdrawkcabnipyt

    @6:20 notice how close this is to another acronym you know? That wasn't by chance.

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  • Matthew Bustamonte

    If that's what you got out of this video I'd guess your own education was sorely lacking. Perhaps you could have used a little more physical engagement with some worn-out tires.

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  • folkmonkey

    Looked into this to see how the project was progressing. WOW this was a sham!!!!
    This program squandered all of the funding in a year, the speaker left "teaching" in Bertie for Berkley and Dr.Z resigned and works in Texas now. Also they failed to mention anything about the numerous other organizations and programs that were already in place in Bertie. Including a college prep program magnet school, and Teach For America has been down there for years. SHAM

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  • Sabin Bista

    My freakish brother managed to make the hottest pole dancer I've seen in my life fall in love with him because he used the Cupid Love System (Google it). It's bad but I wish I found myself joyful for him but I dream a phenomenal person would fall for me. I am really envious. Does that make me a terrible person?

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  • ILykToDoDuhDrifting

    so hawt hawt hawt

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  • SolidariLIKE ,

    AWESOOOOOOME!
    No words… It's all i need to start my project to design the education…
    We need that… We need to finish the social inequality…

    Reply
  • Phil Matic

    I just saw her have a presentation for my design class here at UC Davis. Pretty awesome!

    Reply

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