FREE Mini-Lesson – Sculpture Techniques LIVE Course Preview – The Clay Board


>>DON LANNING: Hey, this is Don Lanning. Today, I’m going to show you some of my techniques for sculpting a wide variety of subject matter. A lot of sculptures that I’ve worked with, I learned so much by watching them. Good morning, everybody. This is Don Lanning
for the Stan Winston School. We’re here to do something really simple. In preparation for the eight-week course, the live course that’s coming up, we’re going to go ahead and we’re going to
make a clay board. The reason why I wanted to do this with you
is because it involves warm clay. There is a potential that you might burn yourself. I want to keep you safe as possible. All of us are out here today to just give
you an example of how to do this. This is the 20 x 20 inch board that we recommend that you get for the class. You’ll notice that it’s much larger than the board that I originally did the DVD
lesson on. There’s a reason for that. After you do your lesson and do your sculpture, I want you to be able to move beyond and do your own thing and apply the lesson
into some other venue or some other technique that’s your own. I want you to run on your
own. So, we’ve got room for that on this canvas. As you’re shopping for this board, you can
go literally have one like this cut. As you in Osh, or Home Depot, you’re going to find these. You’re going to walk in and you’re going to
say, “Look, there’s these boards that are pre-made, precut.
They’ve got a nice beveled edge on them. They’re about $10 to $15.” You can get this if this is what you want. Okay? It doesn’t have to be a board like this. What it does have to be is, it does have to
be larger than say 15 or 16 x 16. It has to be a pretty large board. I don’t want you running out of space during
the lesson. Once again, it doesn’t matter it’s the round
or the square, but please get a large board. At the end of the eight-week course, you’re going to have this in your home and you’re going to see all of this beautiful
sculpture. You’re going to see evidence of the lessons
but you’re also going to have your own stuff, boiling on the surface of this. I want your family and friends to walk in
the room and go, “What is that?” Pretty neat. Anyways, let me talk about ovens. I always recommend a toaster oven. Some people, I just worked for a fellow, and
he’s using a microwave. He and I are running back and forth in tandem
using a microwave to heat our clay. I don’t recommend that you use a microwave to heat your clay. It just changes the clay in a very subtle
and very strange way. It reminds me of Jeff Goldblum, in The Fly. You put your clay in the teleporter, it appears
over here on the other side of the room and there’s just something different about
the clay. It’s more crumbly, cracky. So, once again, a toaster oven, to just evenly heat up your clay. Also, keep your clay warm as you’re sculpting
so that you have a resource to be able to go over, grab some warm clay and not have any slow down. That’s what I recommend. Stay away from the
microwave. Here’s our 20 x 20 inch piece of board. We’re all set. The only tools that you need
for this because this is so simple, is just a couple of paint sticks. Have those nearby and have those handy. I also have the serrated kidney that’s here, just in case I need to clean up an edge of
something of that nature. But, the main thing is just a simple paint stick. I’m going to go ahead and open the oven. About 30 minutes ago, what I did is, I cut up two blocks of Chavant
medium clay and I went ahead and I put them in this cookie
tin. I got this cookie tin for about two or three
bucks. And put the chopped up clay in there and then
I warmed it at 275 for about 30 minutes. I could have just put the big old blocks right
in the cookie tin. I tend to cut up the clay. You don’t even need to do that. Just sit the blocks in there and every once
in a while, check on it so it doesn’t burn and go in with your pain stick and go ahead
� You’ll notice that there’s little blocks of
clay that’s still not melted. Go ahead and move those around, gently, and they’ll go ahead and start to melt out. Now, this looks really good. This has been sitting in there for about 30
minutes and it’s ready to go. So, we’re going to go
right ahead. Once again, you’re going to be very careful
and you’re going to have some rags. I’m going to come in and grab the dish. Grab the tin, I mean. I’m going to take this
out. I’m not going to go ahead and start pouring right off. I’m going to go ahead and I’m going to sit it down on the table. It’s very hot down here so be sure you’re not burning a tabletop. I’m going to look at the consistency. Yeah,
that’s great. So, this looks like caramel or chocolate. But, the main thing is I don’t see any large
chunks rising up so everything has been melted really nicely. Good. So, we’re ready to go. Once again, this is so easy, no fanfare, but
I do want you to take your time, measure your steps so that you don’t create an opportunity to
burn yourself. I’m going to go ahead and grab the edge. Right there, in the center, I’m going to go
ahead and pour out a pool of clay. Awesome. No rushing, just relax. Take a fresh paint stick. So, here I have a clean one. The ones that
I was using before, they’ve got a gummed up end. Take a nice clean paint stick and, now, this is just like icing a cake,
okay? All you’re going to do is you’re going to
come in, you can take both hands or one, doesn’t matter, and just come in and lightly hit the top. Lightly hit the top. When I say, “lightly”, what I’m saying there
is don’t push down and hit the board. You want to keep a thickness of this clay on the board. But this clay is so molten, that it just kind of moves wherever I want
it to move. You’re moving out from the center and you’re
moving towards the outlining edges of the board. Good. You want to take your time here. Don’t worry about the clay cooling down. It’s
not going to cool down too much. Notice I’m not coming all the way out to the
final edge of the board. And, over here, I’m going to do the same. Turn the board. Here, I have a large mound of it right there. I’m going to steady myself. Go across the large mound in the center. All the while, being careful, not to hit the board and leave myself a thickness of anywhere from 1/8″ up to a 1/4″ thickness. This is kind of like the surface of the moon.
You’ll notice there’s all kinds of pops and dings and all that. We don’t care
about that. All we’re doing is making sure that we get
a nice fairly even thickness over the body of the board. That’s it. That’s really it. Now, once this cools down a little bit, we’re going to go ahead and refine it. Okay? We will patch some of the little craters. We will go ahead and process it with our metal
kidney or a spatula. We will trowel it down so that it’s very flat. But, right now, you have achieved the total
goal of what we came here to do today, which is, hopefully, you haven’t burnt yourself
at all. You’ve got your clay thickness on here. You know that this is going to be a nice canvas
for you to come out and do the full lesson for the eight-weeks. Let’s say you’re working in here and you find that you want to come out here.
It’s going to be an easy procedure to come back in, heat some more clay of the
clay that you purchased for the class, and go ahead and fill out this area later. But, right now, we just want to get the bulk of the board
prepared. That’s it. We’re going to let this cool down
a little bit and we’ll be right back. Today, I’m going to show you some of my techniques for sculpting a wide variety of subject matter. We’ve had a few minutes to go ahead and let this start to cool. You’ll see that the edges of the clay are
starting to change value a little bit. Once again, at this stage, quite honestly, you could go ahead and start
the class just like this. You’re ready. Okay? But, some people like to get very prepared and so I can go ahead and start using my metal serrated kidney to go ahead and start
troweling. Look at the build up right there. Okay? I can go ahead and put that into the areas that are not filled
if I want to, or, I can just use this as a tool to go ahead and start troweling to plane down. Here, once again, I see a little bit of build up in here. I can go around and start cleaning, grab a little clay off the surface, come to the area that hadn’t been filled before and go ahead and trowel in. You’re welcome to do that if you’d like. Here, once again, I’ll just move easily across the top of the
clay, pick up a bit of clay on my tool, place it where I have a bald spot or a thin spot or no clay, and go ahead and bring that in. Once again, here’s your board. As you go ahead and you ready yourself to go ahead and start
on our lesson together, you’re going to have this leaned up and let me talk to you about that for a second. I have something that I found at Michael’s
that I love. I only have a small one. I don’t have the
large one. Once again, you can use anything. You don’t have to use
this. I don’t know if you guys have seen this before. This comes in a very large size. It’s for about 10 bucks. It’s not listed in our materials, because you don’t have to have this. You can simply put a bag of wed clay behind
here. You can prop it up. You can do any number of things, put a weight
here, or rub some clay down here, or use clamps. Do whatever you need to get the thing up so
that you can see it and you’re comfortable. Based on your comfort level of when you’re
sitting in your chair, you want to reposition this until you find a place where you say, “Yeah, that’s where I feel comfortable sculpting.” Then, you want to move accordingly. Don’t sweat any of that. Once again, the thing that I also wanted to
share with you today is how easy this is but, also, it doesn’t have to be a specific shape of
board. It does have to be a specific size, the clay doesn’t have to go on in a very precise
way. You can be very loose with this, because in the lesson, we’re going to tighten
up and we’re going to get very specific. This is a loose thing to do and really easy. Don’t burn yourself. If you burn yourself, go to the hospital, immediately, or call me, and I’ll take you to the hospital. No, if you do burn yourself, once again, it’s as simple as “Ooh!” Wipe it on the table, and it’s done. Now. When we rejoin ourselves, you’re going to have a heating place for your clay. You’re going
to have a tray. You’re going to still have two to three blocks of clay left. You’re going to have this board. You’re going to have something behind it so
that you can lean it in some way so that it greets the light that
you have and you’re going to be ready to sculpt with
me. I’m so excited. I’ve got to leave you with one other note. We’ve got to cover a little bit about light. We have some light source traveling in this
way, that’s hitting me in the face right now, and
coming across the board like this. See all these beautiful little shadows? Love that. Your light, during the lesson, I would love
it to be somewhere in here. If I’m sculpting here, like this, my light source is going to be right here. Not directly above my head, but right about here, in relationship to the board. I have a nice shadow that falls down on to the board so that I’m able to see the things that I’m sculpting. I also want you to think a little bit about
the light in your home. Once again, if you have a light fixture in the ceiling, you can make it work by chasing/allowing your workspace to move
around to greet the light that’s up in your ceiling. As long as you have that light streaming down
and falling on the board this way and giving you
shadows like that, you’re going to be fine. You don’t know it yet, but I know it from doing a few of these. It’s funny because I’ve had so many people
come to me and say, “What’s that? That’s bizarre. It’s hard to relate to.” Of course, a lot of these things that you’re
going to be doing and that we’re going to be doing on here, these are made to be going on faces, creatures, plugged in. These are like plug-ins in a computer program where you’re able to take all these techniques
that you learn and that you do and that you create on your own, and you plug them into your future creatures and your future characters. A strange thing happens, that I’ve got to tell you about. You do this panel, you do another one, you do another one. We’re going to do scales, in the future. We’re going to do different kinds of contusions from realistic to what-have-you. We’re going to have different categories. If you have a few of these in your home, you’ll notice that people walk in and they
say, “What is that? It looks like an art piece.”, because it’s in the form of a painting. It’s in the form of a canvas. After lessons, I’ve had people steal these. They’re just gone. You’re like, “What happened to it? What happened
to the demonstration board?” Anyways, the joy of this is at the end. You’re
going to have this board, but it’s not just a board anymore. It’s a moment-by-moment map of everything that we did in the class and, then, what you found in the class that
you liked and you went on and did for yourself. It’s going to be much more than just a board
with clay on it. Anyways, I’m so excited about the class. I am going to close this now but I want to
invite you all to join me. This is going to be a rich and deep experience. I want you to come sign up. I want you to spend those eight-weeks with
me because it’s going to be a unique adventure. I’m also going to be able to have a time to go in-depth with you and really find some of the magic that you have inside of
yourself and be able to start your path into a deeper
understanding of speaking the language of clay. Once again, you guys, please click on the link and look at the description on the sign up page. I invite you to go ahead and join me for an awesome eight weeks. I’ll see you then. This is Don Lanning, for the Stan Winston
School.

100 comments

  • keithopulis

    Hello, I just wondered if it's ok to use a toaster (like the one in the video) for cooking food in after it's been used for heating Chavant clay, or should it be strictly used for clay and nothing else? Thanks!

    Reply
  • Stan Winston School

    Likely the clay would gum up your toaster. Best to keep separate toasters for clay warming and actual cooking. Though the clay certainly won't kill you. – David

    Reply
  • keithopulis

    OK thank you for the quick reply!

    Reply
  • Stan Winston School

    Our pleasure. If you have any other questions, please let us know. And be sure to check out our website to browse our entire tutorial library from the masters of monster making and special effects. (Links in the video description above). Thanks, Matt

    Reply
  • Missy

    It bothered me so much, he kept saying mmk after every sentence.

    Reply
  • xtianor

    it's really cool. ok?

    Reply
  • Barbara Micek

    I learned so many things from you and thank you

    Reply
  • Barbara Micek

    Of course Don! 🙂

    Reply
  • Stan Winston School

    Barbara, Don is a tremendous teacher. If you want to interact with him live online and learn a ton of new techniques, visit our Website to check out his upcoming 4-week webinar, starting on Saturday 10/26. Just go to stanwinstonschool(DOT)com and click on the WEBINARS tab in the navigation bar. -Matt

    Reply
  • problematic

    get maya

    Reply
  • Stan Winston School

    driedpancake, Maya's a great tool. But it's just one of many. And nothing beats a traditional foundation. If you can sculpt in clay, computer programs are much easier to transition into. However, if you haven't mastered traditional materials, your digital work will suffer. -Matt

    Reply
  • Jaden Earle

    Drugs are bad mmk.

    Reply
  • IMpoSibbleyeetctc

    We're is this school??

    Reply
  • Stan Winston School

    We're an online school. Look for us online. The website is the school name. – David

    Reply
  • War Monger

    Cool mini lesson.  Pour melted clay on a board…..nice.

    Reply
  • THEQuest2112

    MAY the 4th BE with YOU

    Reply
  • TheGorknMork

    This video has convinced me. I need to stop stalling and begin. While I am familiar with Lanning's work, and he seems from this video to be an excellent instructor, would this dvd be a good start for someone who has absolutely no experience in sculpting? I may not have the experience, but I have the passion and desire to learn this.

    Reply
  • Jax Nean

    Great tutorial, thanks.

    Reply
  • Sandra Davis

    Great lesson!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Reply
  • Barry Brandhorst

    Good info

    Reply
  • req4106t

    Is this something i could take if i have never worked with clay before?  i just want to learn 

    Reply
  • ROYF farndale

    what type of clay are you using?

    Reply
  • dunexxi

    One giant boring assed ad. Shame on your nasty arses.

    Reply
  • David Smart

    I can't help thinking that a plasterers trowel would work excellently at getting an Even thickness and smooth surface

    Reply
  • Debi

    Your work is amazing

    Reply
  • Octaviano Barrera

    You are so much more better than the otherone I did

    Reply
  • Audhild Bogstad

    Once again … 😉

    Reply
  • sunil chandran

    great

    Reply
  • claybirdgod

    Sooo much clay in that right cuff of that nice jacket…

    Reply
  • Abdul Kadir

    Blufilim

    Reply
  • Michael R

    great teacher…

    Reply
  • ROSE CUPELLI

    I hope he does another one.

    Reply
  • Razake

    'mmkay'

    Reply
  • soul trader

    Er yes great, but I don't geddit… doesn't clay dry out in an oven? Why would it melt?

    Reply
  • mr.wooden-plank

    Cool, thanks for the teaching 😃

    Reply
  • soul trader

    Wow thanks Maggie,

    I must have missed the name – never heard of it before – is it known in Australia and is it available under a generic name? And why not use normal clay? Thanks for the fabulous demos – soooo enjoyable!

    Reply
  • c cgunn

    do you plan on running this again ? if so when? thanks

    Reply
  • Stan Winston School

    @c cgunn This lesson is available at our school website: http://bit.ly/1kTbLjw.  You can sign up for a free three day trial and take a look at all the different on-demand webcourses we offer.  -Maggie

    Reply
  • August Lilly

    cx Hello. I am only 13 but I hope to me a SFX Cosmetologist when I grow older. Your Videos are nice to watch, to give me a feel on what College will be like.

    Reply
  • pelon fuentes

    N

    Reply
  • pelon fuentes
  • Marian Edwards

    Hi great take on clay. I am in South Africa…..what clay type is this

    Reply
  • PRIVATE EYE

    Cool love it.

    Reply
  • stepchildofsoul

    Such a pleasant and passionate guy, must've been a fantastic class!

    Reply
  • shirleystuff

    looks fascinating! What can you do with the end product?  Will this be a hardened relief that can be painted or work of art than can be sold?  I have used oil based clay in the past to create the model for poured molds.  Thanks.

    Reply
  • Mark Ely

    What a freak'n amazing waste of time add. I vcan only imagine how much sleep i would get nodding off during the lecture. This add has removed any interest I've had for sculpting with clay. I no longer want to play with mud

    Reply
  • Silverjda

    Or…you could just use a rolling pin and not deal with all the unnecessary steps.

    Reply
  • Cloud-Yo!

    I love the passion that you demonstrate for this medium and for the course.  It really shows how much you love what you do.

    Reply
  • Petrina Anderson

    If I had a dollar for every time he says "go ahead" so annoying

    Reply
  • Viktor Pou

    hey Don you got a very calm and passionate way of talking

    Reply
  • Chrystal sexydiabetic

    Why are we using a clayboard?  Why is it needed? Can't I use a kitchen counter top or wax paper?  Even if its a preference I would like to hear that.  Being a novice these small details are not as apparent to me.    Thanks I enjoy watching Don.

    Reply
  • Mustafa Alsamarra'y

    Man! You sound a bit like Nicolas Cage

    Reply
  • Mia Monroe

    Hey, can I use this clay with rebound 25 molding rubber?

    Reply
  • Kenny Altamirano

    what kind of clay he is using?

    Reply
  • soila vicente

    how did you do that.

    Reply
  • soila vicente

    did someone tot you.

    Reply
  • Sfx Queen

    I just ordered some oil clay this morning! Thank you so much for these videos yay

    Reply
  • hauk

    Дебил, куртку не мог снять, рукав заговнил.

    Reply
  • 1MissLovely1

    You have to make your thumbnails better so more people would be attracted to your videos 🙂

    Reply
  • Tomáš Pokorný

    What a nice flat clay

    Reply
  • hala hala

    مو حلووووووو

    Reply
  • DannyWarlegs

    I used those black picture racks he showed to hold face casts weighing up to 10, 12 lbs each, just so they looked better being stored on the shelves, and so I could easily see which one I needed

    Reply
  • milspire

    i didnt know clay melted. i thought it hardens in heat.

    Reply
  • Emily Manning

    I'm late to the party! I've actually started using monster clay. Would it also be suitable to get a little toaster oven for melting and keeping the clay soft and warm whilst i'm working? Thank you!

    Reply
  • freekwhensee

    Do you not use a crock pot for heating clay?

    Reply
  • Goproextreme

    m'kay

    Reply
  • MCcookiebreath

    RIP Rob Ford

    Reply
  • tombulasok51

    Lesson I've learn -How to melt clay and spread it like sht in a rectangular board in 15 minutes.

    Reply
  • Mauricio Lucas

    the secret is to rub the sleeve of the jacket

    Reply
  • savory

    he looks like uncle chris

    Reply
  • Igor Svačić

    geat lesson mr mackey,mkay?

    Reply
  • Anthony van Hamond

    if i may give a suggestion…. pls don't have your teachers wearing their jackets… it's like he made this video on the end of a working day on his way home. also his sleeves are dragging in the clay.
    for the rest nice video.

    Reply
  • Amanda

    What is the purpose of a clay board? I've been working on teaching myself as much as I can until my husband and I get stationed somewhere that has a proper school, but I've never seen this sort of thing before.

    Reply
  • C. K.

    not the best jacket to wear while spreading liquid clay, Mmkay?

    Reply
  • Erik Ostberg

    I love how he said M'Kay after every sentence. I felt like I was getting a lesson from Mr. Mackey. lol

    Reply
  • Alex

    will this lesson work with natural air drying clay?

    Reply
  • ADHAM MOHAMED

    يا متناك

    Reply
  • Zac Fitzgerald

    Great teacher.

    Reply
  • James Trotman

    hey whats the material your using?

    Reply
  • GoodMemoriez

    I will go ahead and like this video. mkey

    Reply
  • Mark Cunningham

    I Love your Jacket.. and the Video is Awesome, thank you for the Lessons 🙂

    Reply
  • Richard Bailey

    how bout a bigger trowel in the beginning

    Reply
  • Richard Bailey

    how bout a bigger trowel in the beginning

    Reply
  • Richard Bailey

    how bout a bigger trowel in the beginning

    Reply
  • Richard Bailey

    how bout a bigger trowel in the beginning

    Reply
  • Baked Creations

    Why the ladder jacket, did you go to a night club in a hurry after shooting this video?

    Reply
  • Anara H

    So u show people how to warm something up and spread it on a board. Hmmm. This may be the worst thing you could have shown to get people interested in what you're doing.

    Reply
  • Louise Wakely

    Awesome video, thank you very muich 🙂 x

    Reply
  • Dhananjay Solanke

    Wherry nice job

    Reply
  • Peter Cachovan

    Very good lesson,keep doing it.
    I have one question?
    Do You made the video about woman body sculpture?

    Reply
  • Yuri Zopov

    All the time looked at the poor jacket

    Reply
  • Mystique Misty13

    Don. WOW what PASSION YOU HAVE. I wish all teacher's were like you. Keep spreading the love love.

    Reply
  • Southern Scythe

    Should've been a 30 sec video.

    Reply
  • DragonFeathers

    Microwaves destroy the molecular composition of virtually EVERYTHING you put in them from water to clay. If you look under a microscope at the structure of something that has been microwaved it doesn't resemble the original product. I agree with you about using the toaster oven.

    Reply
  • MMShaggy

    I love your enthusiasm, so many times you listen to an instructor and you can almost feel their animosity at having to teach someone.

    Reply
  • lawrence sserwadda

    i do appreciate for the demo,keep it up

    Reply
  • Twisted Endings Productions

    I own at least 70 how-to DVDs from SWSCA, and I will say that Don is,  by far, the most passionate instructor I have seen yet. Don exudes a true and unique desire to help us succeed. It is sincere and heartfelt.

    Reply
  • eddie julian

    Don is an inspiring human being.

    Reply
  • Andrew Benepe

    been using chavant medium for decades. small tip, get one of those electric heating pads from the drug store, wrap your clay and put it in a soft cooler bag..It sits at your elbow and never gets to hot or cold.

    Reply
  • yashhh sabri

    hi sir ! I think u know the right Technique making oil based clay. so plz u make a video on it .

    Reply

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