How to Create a Sculpture, Part 6 – Kevin Caron


(Text on screen): How to Create a Sculpture, Part 6, Kevin Caron, www.kevincaron.com The Voice: Hey, Kevin. Catch a shark? Kevin Caron: Hey. No, not yet. But, boy, it sure looks like it. If you’d been here just a few minutes ago, you could have seen me picking this thing up off the floor. Got my ring all laid out finally, got all my triangles ready to go, and I went to slide the first triangle onto this half-inch rod after I drilled that half-inch hole, and it doesn’t fit. Hmm. What’s up with that? So, this is some of that half-inch rod. And I check it with the caliper and find out it’s not 0.500 like it’s supposed to be. Or slightly under, like 0.498; 97; 99. Right in there; you know, just slightly under half an inch so you can drill a half-inch hole and expect this to go through it. Nuh-uh. This stuff measured out at 0.508. What the heck happened with that? It’s oversize. Of course, I didn’t have another drill that would fit it. You know, the next size drill I had was five-eighths, so it’s too big. The next size reamer I had was, like, 0.560. So, nice little bit of wobble in there. So, I actually wound up having to order and wait for a 0.510 reamer so then I could take the triangles in a nice, big stack. You know, like, 20 of them at a time. Load it onto the mill. Line everything up; get everything all straight and ready to go. Ream ’em out. Get ’em just the right size or get them slightly oversize so they’ll fit on here. I even; I had to come back with the grinder and just take the scale off, just to get it to slide on there. And, boy, some of them were a nice, snug fit going on there. No wobble or anything. So, finally got it all together. All sitting on the ground. Welded the last point shut. And I got eight tie-down straps and thought: Well, OK. I’ve seen them do this all the time. Measure it out. Get eight different points on there where I’m picking it up from eight different locations all up to the ring, all up to my gantry crane. Pick it about two inches up off the floor. Everything was fine. It was holding. It was supporting it. It didn’t like it, but it was supporting it. And then one of the triangles moved. And as soon as that one moved, the next one moved, the next one moved, all the ones on the other side are moving. Man, it was a race to get it back onto the ground. It just bent everything all up. So, I got it all straightened out, got it all set and ready to go. I went out back and I got some of this 2-inch-square tubing and made this little star-shaped lifting ring, or, you know, or lifting jig, to go under it. Put a ring on it, pick it up that way. No problem. Pick it right up. Set it on a stand I had for a grinder on there. So, you know, everything’s up in the air now. Now I can get my gantry crane out of the way. Now I can start setting my angles on my triangles; get those welded in. Go on to the next step. So, sometimes you’ve got to back up. You know, sometimes you do something and you find out, “Oh, that didn’t work at all.” So, you try something else and then you finally figure it out. You get what you need. So, let me get the crane out of the way and I’ll get back to work. I’ll see you next time. (Text on screen): Subscribe to See More Videos! See and hear more at KevinCaron.com. Filmed at Kevin Caron Studios in Phoenix, Arizona with artist Kevin Caron Welding equipment provided by Longevity, Inc. Wardrobe by Stu D. O’Gere See more about this project at www.kevincaron.com/art_detail/wherever_you_go.html

20 comments

  • ruuman

    when you purchase general metal construction metal it's always supplied with a % of variation on the stated size. My company just found out the hard way with a tube order that was supposed to fit inside each other, sods law the outer was under spec and the inner was over, can you guess what happened!! 🙂

    Reply
  • Bob the metal guy

    Hang in there Kevin

    Reply
  • STEVE ROB REVIEWS

    Fantastic,great persentation. I have a feeling your buying hot rolled steel, next time get the cold rolled and your good to go.

    Reply
  • Mustie1

    you mean that stuff dosent just happen to me,,, thanks for the vid kevin it had me crackin up picturing it,,

    Reply
  • ibrahim alalaty

    great video sir 🙂

    Reply
  • Charles Struble

    That rod must be one of those pesky metric 1/2" rods… Hey Kevin, (sorry Mary) I bet your friend machinist Chuck has the right size drill bit… Like this project isn't complicated enough…

    Reply
  • Kevin Caron, Artist

    Must be…. Haven't seen old Chuck in a long time. Think he moved or something…

    Sad…

    Reply
  • Kevin Caron, Artist

    God I hate it when that happens…

    Imagine you guys did the same thing I did….WTF!!!!

    Reply
  • Kevin Caron, Artist

    I was at the steel yard today and took a quick measure, the whole stack is that way..
    Have to start taking a micrometer to the steel yard now..

    Reply
  • Kevin Caron, Artist

    Yeah, all hot roll. The cold roll is in another yard and I keep forgetting to look for it…

    I will learn someday..

    Reply
  • Greg's Garage

    Check your bill. They probably charged you more for the oversized rods!!! Thanks for the insight.

    Reply
  • ruuman

    Heads were rolling, it was a huge order, they have learnt now. CDS every time, it may cost more, but it's the right size 🙂 luckily we can use the wrong stuff for something else.
    Great video's by the way Kevin, really enjoying this set.

    Reply
  • C Crosby

    Wow! Nice and complex, like you like 'em.

    Reply
  • Jack Connors

    Kev,,thats why you have to pay thru the snozel for cold rolled!!!!!!!!!!! Never seel 1/2 round 1/2 Inch!,jack

    Reply
  • lepomismacrochirus

    You can drill a slightly oversized hole with your 0.5 inch drill bit by re-sharping it with one of the cutting edges a bit longer than the other…. to late now, but comes in handy at times. Thanks for all of your great videos.

    Reply
  • Kevin Caron, Artist

    Is that why sometimes the hole is too big?!?!?! Damn, learned something new today. Thanks for posting…..

    Reply
  • -24Seven-

    If you want precision rod order drill rod

    Reply
  • Kevin Caron, Artist

    Thanks, I will talk to the steel yard about that….

    Reply
  • Mike De La Mater

    I hate it when that happens! And I'll vouch for the off-center sharpening, it works. And I really have a hard time believing you didn't have a bit!

    Reply
  • Beau Jest44

    Just found this series, and it answers most of my questions on internal structure. But I am curious about the number of internal ribs, and how you welded the skin to the ribs when there was no access to the inside. Have you learned from experience that one every 6° is really required? I would have figured that the skin gives the structure a good amount of stiffness and strength; perhaps enough to make do with only 30 ribs.
    Thanks for going to the trouble of sharing this with us.

    Reply

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