How To Make A Simple Balsa Crankbait


Hi guys Doc Lures here with lure making 101 a simple tutorial series for beginners to learn wooden lure making with minimal tools materials or experience In this tutorial we’ll make a 70 mm shallow diving balsa crankbait See this lure making project in “Fishing Monthly” magazine www.FishingMonthly.com.au For lure making templates and tips MakeWoodenLures.com/Fishing-Monthly/ Transfer the side profile of your crankbait 12 mm thick balsa wood Separate the blanks with a sharp utility knife and pare away some waste Don’t pare right to the line. I’m going to leave a little bit of extra waste and in the next step We’ll clean this up and square the blanks It’s very important to keep your crankbait blanks square at this stage So that your hook hangers and tow points are properly aligned Work with the grain here and always carve away from your hands To square my crankbait blank I’ve glued a piece of sandpaper to a wood block I’m holding the lure on a flat surface and running the sanding block over until I’ve shaped the lure right back down to the line I’ll switch over to a curved block to sand the concave side of the lower belly Use fresh sandpaper and light pressure for best results Now we’re going to mark the location of our hardware I’m marking a center line on the belly We’re keeping these handmade lures simple so we”ll use twist wires for the tow point and hook hangers That means drilling a few holes to glue the twist eyes into I’m using a battery drill with a 2 or 2.5 mm drill bit Take care not to drill into your fingers! For the weights I’m using a brad point bit of 4.5 mm diameter Brad point bits allows us to drill accurately. We can open with a larger drill later if necessary Use a fine-tooth saw to make a slot for the diving lip Be sure to get this as square as possible Which is really important to be able to tune the crankbait. Having a crooked diving lip makes it very difficult Now shape the top profile. I’m trimming away the waste down to the lines we marked the earlier Once again, don’t cut all the way down to the line. We’re going to use a sanding block To clean up and square up timber Work slowly work gently and take small slivers of balsa wood Try and keep the wood as square in cross section as possible. Once again, that allows you to get everything aligned properly for a high-performance handmade crankbait Now we can start to knock those corners off and round off the lure Here you can see I’m making guidelines for my carving These are basically just a line that goes halfway between the center line and the edge of the timber I’m going to do this on all four sides Once again doing it by eye rather than measuring Take small slivers with a utility knife and pare down between the two carving guidelines Once you’ve cut the four corners off you can smooth the shape up a little bit with the utility knife Then pick up some sandpaper and clean the lure body, refine the shape. Balsa wood is quite soft so It’s very easy to leave too much timber and spoil the shape There are three ways to add tow points and hook hangers to handmade lures Screw eyes simply screw into the timber handmade twist eyes made out of stainless steel wire and glued into holes. And a through-wire which runs in a slot from the front to the back of the lure For simplicity we’ll use twist eyes because they’re quick, easy and don’t don’t require special materials And they’re strong enough for a small wooden crankbait When using these lures for line classes of six kilograms or higher I’d suggest going for a through wire just for the extra strength and security Here’s how I make my twist eyes. This is a three millimeter drill bit I’m simply bending a piece of 1.2 millimeter stainless steel wire around the drill I use 316 grade marine stainless steel wire for this because I don’t want corrosion in my lure With screw eyes ready to go I’m going to mix some epoxy. Use 24-hour curing super strength adhesives for this 5-minute curing epoxy breaks down quickly and isn’t strong enough Be sure to get plenty of epoxy into the hole and all over the shaft of the twist eye Rotating the twist tie against the twist will push the adhesive deeper into the hole rather than squeeze it out Repeat the process for the tow point and the belly hook and you’re ready to installing weights Why are weights important for this handmade lure? Well, what the weight does is helps to stop the lure from rolling over onto its side in use. That allows the diving lip to work better and gives you a better, stronger more stable action over a wider range of cranking speeds You don’t require a lot of weight to stabilize a small lure like this. In fact, I’ve split a small ball sinker in two with a utility knife The weight that I’m installing weighs around about one gram I’ve filled the hole with epoxy, placed the weight into the wet epoxy and pushed it n place And I’m simply going to add some more epoxy over the top fill the void that’s left. Sometimes the epoxy will shrink during curing And you need to apply a second batch to fill the belly of the lure up so that the weight can’t be seen Once your adhesive is dry it’s time to harden your balsa lure bodies Balsa is a very soft wood, so applying some epoxy to the outside of the lure and allowing it to soak into the grain can make your wooden lure more durable and longer-lasting Here I’m brushing on epoxy that’s been thinned with methylated spirit (denatured alcohol) to make it soak into the grain better Simply brush it on liberally Work it in and make sure it soaks as far into the wood as possible It helps to have the balsa lure blank warm before you start so the pores of the wood are open Allow at least 24 hours for the epoxy to cure and then smooth the lure off using wet sanding paper I’m using 240 grit. You could use 400 grit if you prefer The idea is to sand until everything feels smooth, and all the gloss has been removed from the epoxy This process not only hardens the wood but waterproofs it and fills the grain for a better looking paint job Here’s how the crankbait lure should look once the sanding is finished I’m going to install the diving lip before I paint the lure This is a personal preference, some people prefer to install the diving lip after the lure has been painted My diving lip has been cut from two millimeter polycarbonate using a pair of kitchen scissors Work some epoxy into the lure here. I’m using a paper clip to work at well in Wipe off the excess Slide the polycarbonate crankbait lip into the lure making sure it’s properly aligned before setting it aside to cure If you’re just getting started lure making there’s nothing wrong with using a brush some artists acrylic, model paints or lacquer Or perhaps picking up an aerosol can or two from the touch up section of the auto store But if you get more serious about making lures you’ll want to get an airbrush So for this tutorial, I’m gonna show you some simple airbrush techniques that I use I’m starting by spraying the epoxied lure with some Autobourne white sealer The purpose of this coat is to give good adhesion of the paint of the wooden lure Next I’ll give the lure a coat of wicked yellow. This is a great opaque color that’s perfect as a base Notice. I’m not spraying on one heavy coat but doing it in several light passes to get a nice even color without any runs On the back of the lure I’m going to go over the wicked yellow with Autoair metallic bronze give a nice bronzy sheen Then I’ll spray a little Autoair red under the chin to give a “bleeding gill” effect In transparent black with a simple stencil I’ll paint gills and fins on the lure Then I’ll use a fine piece of wire to dot some black and then some red dots all over the surface Finally I’ll dab some eyes on the lure using some drill bits to give the finished effect Hope you enjoyed the tutorial and don’t forget to check out my website MakeWoodenLures.com for tips, templates and tutorials bye for now

25 comments

  • Darryl BEAN

    Great video but the music is … well you get the point. thanks for the vid.

    Reply
  • Darryl BEAN

    Ive come backhand watched your vid again. You are for sure one of the best at this teaching aspect but the music kills me. LOL many thanks for your efforts.

    Reply
  • Bagwell Fishing

    Nice

    Reply
  • Jakelol1980

    How big and heavy fish will the twist eyes hold on a balsa lure of that size manage that i epoxy with several layers before it breaks?

    Reply
  • cjstrick2010

    after so many years of looking for a hobby…i've found my 2nd one thanks to you sir….I'm watching, learning this awesome craft from you
    Thanks

    Reply
  • fish unlimited

    This is a great video I tried this and it did not work so well as yours,do you sell these by any chance and if so how much I would be very interested in one if you do

    Reply
  • Beck Horsburgh

    Where do your get the stainless wire from for your twist eyes?

    Reply
  • lil casper

    The music makes it difficult to hear your voice

    Reply
  • Emptypockets51

    Ya. Should be a GREAT video but the freakin music. Can only hear maybe half of what you are saying. But thank you for the video.

    Reply
  • Jessica Leigh

    My tv is obnoxiously loud & I still missed half of what u said… then I'm blasted with the already too loud music. Hopefully ur others are watchable 😕 It was a nice finished piece, though 🎣

    Reply
  • Сергей Шелковников

    ты не русский чоли ?

    Reply
  • Сергей Шелковников

    никогда наши страны не должны воевать – понял ДЕБИЛ ТЫ

    Reply
  • Сергей Шелковников

    я человек МИРА!!!

    Reply
  • ldybgd

    good its not just me. Love the video, love the tutelage, hate that I can barely hear you over the music, which adds nothing to the video.

    Reply
  • lucious brun

    Wtf is with the music ? Do Aus schools play music in lessons when the teacher is talking ? Does any other form of tuition ? No ? Do u know why not ? Cuz it's 4ucking counter productive as well as annoying as f. What a shame !

    Reply
  • Hc custom fishing rods

    Music is to loud…nice lure

    Reply
  • Dhanrajh Persad

    Love the video it's very interesting but those chemicals such as that clear epoxy may be hard to find in my country…and if I could locate it, it could be costly…

    Reply
  • Famille Eatyourmails

    Great vid bro !
    One advice, you should put gloves on before paint job.
    Paint is a real poison, I know that, I used to work in paint industry.

    Reply
  • Anthony Lacognata

    What's the point if being acurate with a bradpoint bit if you marked the center line by eye without measuring tools?

    Reply
  • Jack m

    Another video ruined with music. Some of us like to keep our full mind on what you're doing, we want to be able to hear you, and not be distracted. And it's not just you…seems many on Youtube copy each other in attempt to make your videos more enticing, and none of you stopped to think if it is enticing to begin with for many of us….Or is it just me?

    This is the second try in my attempt to get more teaching and less candy….neeeext!

    Reply
  • Bobber the Clown

    great instruction thanks so much I[m just starting to make my own lures with some success. I will definitely be following you. thanks

    Reply
  • MrLuismi78

    My friend said it was the latest and greatest thing for bass fishing>>>allabout.wiki/k8us He grabbed his phone and immediately started bragging about it to his fishing buddies!

    Reply
  • Faustina Pantaleón

    Is that heavy

    Reply
  • Romaine Athey

    Make it yourself thanks to woodprix plans. I think it's the best way to learn how to build it in the cheapest way.

    Reply
  • goldo prime

    What kind of wood is that?

    Reply

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