Watercolor Painting Basics : Watercolor Paint Brushes


Ok, brushes. I’m going to start with the most-used
brushes. The most-used brushes are round brushes that form a good point. That’s very important
because, you see, watercolor brushes are shaped different than oil brushes. Because oil is
generally thicker medium, you need a lot more different sizes of brushes. Whereas with watercolor,
if you have a great, sharp point that’s long, then you can get by with less different brushes.
This is a Number 10, and this is a Number 14, and you can also get special brushes like
this online, as well as these were purchased online. And this is your detail brush. It
makes a very fine point; it makes very fine lines. And I’ll show you in a minute how that
works. Then you’ll need bigger brushes, like a 1-inch brush and a 1-and-a-half. But the
1-and-a-half is not so important. The 1-inch is pretty important. Also, if you’re working
with big, large pieces of paper, something like a mop, a size 20 or larger mop, would
be good to do large wet-on-wet areas. This is not used very much at all. The brushes
that I get, the round ones, are half and half synthetic and Kolinsky red sable. I find dollar-for-dollar,
they’re the best value. And you normally can buy a brush for under $30. That’s a Number
12. I also like brushes that are tapered right in the middle, that are fatter, because they’re
more well-balanced and they feel better in the hand.

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